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When creating an ordered list of elements, I can think of three reasonable ways to access one by index:

Give it a unique id with a number at the end and use string manipulation:

<ol>
 <li id="item-0"></li>
 <li id="item-1"></li>
 <li id="item-2"></li>
</ol>

...

for(var i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
   $('#item-' + i).doWhatever();
}

give them the same class and use the eq selector:

<ol>
 <li class="item"></li>
 <li class="item"></li>
 <li class="item"></li>
</ol>

...

for(var i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
   $('.item').eq(i).doWhatever();
}

or give them the same class and use the nth-child selector:

<ol>
 <li class="item"></li>
 <li class="item"></li>
 <li class="item"></li>
</ol>

...

for(var i = 1; i <= 3; i++) {
   $('.item:nth-child(' + i + ')').doWhatever();
}

What are the advantages and disadvantages of each? Are there other, better ways?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I've added a fourth test case to your perf test: http://jsperf.com/item1-vs-item-eq-1/2

Considering your points in order:

  • Speed It's easily the fastest method of those presented
  • String manipulation None
  • Indexing Starts from 0
  • Styling You can style based on the parent, or you may choose to add additional class(es) to the list items themselves
  • Portability That could just have easily been implemented with getElementById and childNodes

The main thing to consider, I think, is that all of your methods involve repeatedly querying the DOM as you're iterating through the list. If you're only ever accessing a single element, that's not a big deal, but if you're going to be working through the entire list, then only making a single query is going to make a big difference performance-wise.

EDIT Out of curiosity, I updated my case again not to use jQuery for locating the list at all, instead just using the barebones DOM API as I'd mentioned above.
Even with the changes Sandor made after pointing out my dumb mistake, there's a noticeable performance impact. With that in mind, I'd say it's mostly going to come down to your specific use case and how you weigh speed versus versatility in locating your list items.

share|improve this answer
    
I made some changes to your test case, because in your fourth you were performing a get operation with text() and in all other you were performing a set operation text(i). the results are a little bit different jsperf.com/item1-vs-item-eq-1/3 – Sandor A Dec 12 '12 at 5:58
    
I just noticed that; thanks for the update! I didn't read the tests closely enough :) – dfreeman Dec 12 '12 at 6:01
    
Great points about keeping DOM queries low – Tom Smilack Dec 19 '12 at 14:53

A few differences come to mind:

  • Speed: (at least on Chrome) the first is about twice as fast as the others, according to these test cases: http://jsperf.com/item1-vs-item-eq-1
  • String manipulation: the second is the only one that doesn't require it
  • Indexing from 0 or 1: the third is indexed from 1 rather than 0, which could cause problems depending on how you build/access the HTML
  • Styling: if you want to style all of the elements similarly, the second and third don't require any additional classes
  • Portability: if you have to change frameworks, the first and third may be more portable because they use standard CSS selectors
share|improve this answer
    
"the first is about twice as fast as the others" Naturally since you're selecting by id. – BoltClock Dec 12 '12 at 6:20
    
I had heard ids are faster, but I guess I didn't realize by how much. – Tom Smilack Dec 19 '12 at 14:53

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