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Say I do this:

NSManagedObjectContext *context = #a managed object context";
NSString *entityName = #an entity name#;
NSFetchRequest *requestForAll = [NSFetchRequest requestWithEntityName:entityName];
NSArray *allObj = [context executeFetchRequest:requestForAll];

for (NSString *name in allNamesArray){
    NSFetchRequest *requestForOne = [NSFetchRequest requestWithEntityName:entityName];
    requestForOne.predicate = [NSPredicate predicateWithFormat:@"name == %@",name];
    NSArray *ObjsWithName = [context executeFetchRequest:requestForOne];
    #do some work with the obj#
}

Does the fetch in the loop incur a trip to the persistent store every time? Or those fetches will only be performed in coredata's row cache?

EDIT I've written a fragment of testing code : You need to create a core data entity named "Person" and it should have an attribute named "name", which is of type string.

use this code to populate some data:

self.array = @[@"alkjsdfkllaksjdf",@"asldjflkajdklsfjlk;aj",@"aflakjsdl;kfjalksdjfklajkldhkl;aj",@"aljdfkljalksdjfl;j" ,@"flajdl;kfjaklsdjflk;j",@"akldsjfklajdslkf",@"alkdjfkljaklsdjflkaj",@"alsdjflkajsdflj",@"adlkfjlkajsdfkljkla",@"alkdjfklajslkdfj"];

NSString *firstRunKey = @"oh its first run!";
NSString *firstRun = [[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] objectForKey:firstRunKey];
if (!firstRun) {
    for (NSString *name in self.array) {
        Person *p = [NSEntityDescription insertNewObjectForEntityForName:@"Person" inManagedObjectContext:self.managedObjectContext];
        p.name = name;
    }
}
[self.managedObjectContext save];
[[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] setObject:firstRunKey forKey:firstRunKey];
[[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] synchronize];

profile this two methods and you'll find usingCoreData costs much more time than usingFilterArray!

static int caseCount = 1000;
-(void)usingCoreData
{
    NSLog(@"core data");
    NSFetchRequest *request = [[NSFetchRequest alloc] initWithEntityName:@"Person"];
    NSArray *allPersons = [self.managedObjectContext executeFetchRequest:request error:nil];

    for (int i = 0; i < caseCount; i++){
        for (NSString *name in self.array) {
            request.predicate = [NSPredicate predicateWithFormat:@"name == %@",name];
            NSArray *result = [self.managedObjectContext executeFetchRequest:request error:nil];
        }
    }
}

-(void)usingFilterArray
{
    NSLog(@"filter array");
    NSFetchRequest *request = [[NSFetchRequest alloc] initWithEntityName:@"Person"];
    NSArray *allPersons = [self.managedObjectContext executeFetchRequest:request error:nil];

    for (int i = 0; i < caseCount; i++){
        for (NSString *name in self.array) {
            NSArray *array = [allPersons filteredArrayUsingPredicate:[NSPredicate predicateWithFormat:@"name == %@",name]];
        }
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

The fetch will come from the specified cache when available.

EDIT: Here's a link to a great tutorial that shows how to set up a NSFetchedResultsController that uses a cache.

http://www.raywenderlich.com/?p=999

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thanks, is there any document telling this? –  CarmeloS Dec 12 '12 at 5:48
    
The document called common sense...otherwise what is the cache for? Well you can confirm it if you wish. The article mentions a way to turn on all SQL commands to see what is really happening. –  borrrden Dec 12 '12 at 5:51
    
@borrrden that's not very nice –  Jeff Wolski Dec 12 '12 at 6:00
    
Nope, it's not...but to me asking for "a document telling this" is like saying "I don't believe your answer" –  borrrden Dec 12 '12 at 6:09
    
@borrrden It sounds like he's looking for a proof, you know, that's how computer science works, and science in general, proof based. But I think you already know that... –  Valentin Radu Dec 12 '12 at 6:22
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Guess I need to answer my question myself.

I tested it and found, every time a fetch executed, core data will translate your NSFetchRequest into SQL command and invoke a data base query,the query result is firstly NSManagedObjectIDs, caching is applied to get the NSManagedObject from a NSManagedObjectID.

In conclusion, it caches object, but doesn't cache query result.

That means you execute the same NSFetchRequest for 10 times, it will query your persistent store for 10 times, event though you will get 10 times the same result. So in such situation, filtering array in memory will perform better than fetching.

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