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I have several arrays with different names. The following are my array names.

@node_level1_1_1=read_array_level2(@node_level1_1);
@node_level1_2_1=read_array_level2(@node_level1_2);
...
@node_level1_11_1=read_array_level2(@node_level1_11);

I want to parse the array starting from @node_level1_1_1 to @node_level1_11_1 another subroutine function.I tried writing this code it didn't work out.

for ($j=1; $j < 12; $j++) {

  my $var= output_data_xml_nodes(4,@node_level1_$j_1);

}

It throws the following error when I run the code:

Scalar found where operator expected at ./html_parser1.pl line 153, near "@node_level1_$j_1" (Missing operator before $j_1?) syntax error at ./html_parser1.pl line 153, near "@node_level1_$j_1" Execution of ./html_parser1.pl aborted due to compilation errors.

Is there any increment the array's. Kindly let me know.

Thanks, Anand

share|improve this question
    
First of all: use better variable names. Secondly, what does read_array_level2() do? –  Jack Maney Dec 12 '12 at 6:28
1  
Because ... you seem to be trying to modify a variable name with the contents of another variable. @node_level1_$j_1 ? You can't do that. Which is why it's telling you it's a syntax error. –  Brian Roach Dec 12 '12 at 6:29
1  
[rereads the question] Oh...oh god, no. Scrap what you're doing and use a better data structure. A hash of array references comes to mind. –  Jack Maney Dec 12 '12 at 6:30

2 Answers 2

I think you need to use more complex data structures. While creating variable names is possible (with no strict 'refs'; @{construct string here}) it is evil, wrong, unmaintainable etc. And it only works with global variables *shudder*

What your code example should look like:

my @new_node;
$new_node[1][1][1]  = read_array_level2($old_node[1][1]);
$new_node[1][2][1]  = read_array_level2($old_node[1][2]);
...;
$new_node[1][11][1] = read_array_level2($old_node[1][11]);

or better, use the loop

my @new_node;
for my $i (1 .. 12) {
    $new_node[1][$i][1] = read_array_level2($old_node[1][$i])
}

However, you will be dealing with array references, not arrays, most of the time. Read and re-read

and friends.

share|improve this answer

One way is to use hashes:

use strict;
use warnings;

my @array_1 = (1, 11);
my @array_2 = (2, 22);
my %arrays  = ( 
  array_1 => [ @array_1],
  array_2 => [ @array_2]
);

for my $i (1, 2) {
  print join(",", @{$arrays{"array_$i"}}), "\n";
}

Another way is to use eval:

use strict;
use warnings;

my @array_1 = (1, 11);
my @array_2 = (2, 22);

for my $i (1, 2) {
  my $array_ref = eval('\@'."array_$i");
  print join(",", @$array_ref), "\n";;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @perreal I will try to execute the code and let you if works or not. –  user128956 Dec 12 '12 at 6:46

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