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how to write a formula like

v_r (t)=∑_(n=0)^(N-1)▒〖A_r (L_2-L_1 ) e^j(ω_c t-4π/λ (R+υt+L_(1+L_2 )/2 cos⁡〖(θ)sin⁡(ω_r t+2πn/N)))〗 ┤) sinc(4π/λ-L_(2-L_1 )/2 cos⁡(θ) sin⁡(ω_r t+2πn/N))〗

in c#?

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2 Answers 2

You have to convert the formula to something the compiler recognizes.

The Formula

To it's equivalent using the a combination of basic algebra and the Math class like so:

p = rho*R*T + (B_0*R*T-A_0-((C_0) / (T*T))+((E_0) / (Math.Pow(T, 4))))*rho*rho +
    (b*R*T-a-((d) / (T)))*Math.Pow(rho, 3) +
    alpha*(a+((d) / (t)))*Math.Pow(rho, 6) +
    ((c*Math.Pow(rho, 3)) / (T*T))*(1+gamma*rho*rho)*Math.Exp(-gamma*rho*rho);

Example taken from: Converting Math Equations in C#

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I understand this is an old post but I am tying to achieve the same thing but the formula that I am coping from word is not being properly parsed. Would it be something to do with Version of word. I am using 2010 where in the article its using 2007. Any idea? –  user25018 Oct 25 '13 at 10:13
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Well, first you have to figure out what all those symbols mean. I see the sigma which usually indicates sum-of, with ∑_(n=0)^(N-1) probably translating to:

 N-1
∑
 n=0

This generally means the sum of the following expression where n varies from 0 to N-1. So I gather you'd need a loop there.

The expression to be calculated within that loop consists of a lof of trigonometric-type functions involving π, θ, sin and cos, and the little known sinc which I assume is a typo :-)

The bottom line is that you need to understand the current expression before you can think about converting it to another form like a C# program. Short of knowing where it came from, or a little bit of context, we probably can't help you that much though there's always a possibility that we have a savant/genius here that will recognise that formula off the top of their head.

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