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I have this interface:

public interface IValidationCRUD
{
    public ICRUDValidation IsValid(object obj);
    private void AddError(ICRUDError error);
}

But when I use it (Implement Interface, automatic generation of code), I get this:

public class LanguageVAL : IValidationCRUD
{   
    public ICRUDValidation IsValid(object obj)
    {
        throw new System.NotImplementedException();
    }

    public void AddError(ICRUDError error)
    {
        throw new System.NotImplementedException();
    }   
}

The method AddError is public and not private as I wanted.

How can I change this?

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I'm surprised this compiles, I'm sure when I've been on 'auto pilot' typing out an interface and added 'public' without thinking the compiler has complained at me. –  Kirschstein Sep 5 '09 at 14:38
    
It doesn't compile. You can't have private methods in an interface, and you're not even allowed to specify public as that is implicit for all members of an interface. –  Brian Rasmussen Sep 5 '09 at 14:49
    
I just wrote the interface and after tried to used it on the other class. Visual Studio din't compile it. –  SmartStart Sep 5 '09 at 15:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

An interface can only have public methods. You might consider using an abstract base class with an protected abstract method AddError for this. The base class can then implement the IValidationCRUD interface, but only after you have removed the private method of course.

like this:

public interface IValidationCRUD
{
    ICRUDValidation IsValid(object obj);
}

public abstract class ValidationCRUDBase: IValidationCRUD {
    public abstract ICRUDValidation IsValid(object obj);
    protected abstract void AddError(ICRUDError error);
}
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1  
A (well formed) interface can only have public methods. Interestingly, the CLR supports constants, fields, and even static (type) constructors for interfaces. This is because an interface is implemented just as any other type definition. –  Robert Venables Sep 5 '09 at 16:21
    
Fields on interfaces are not CLS-Compliant though, no? –  Botz3000 Sep 5 '09 at 16:48
1  
Correct. CLS-compliant interfaces cannot contain static members because languages such as c# are not able to define or access them. –  Robert Venables Sep 5 '09 at 17:58
    
@RobertVenables: What would be the effect of an interface that was declared with internal members? If the behavior was that references of that interface type could be exchanged with outside code, but only the assembly declaring the interface could implement it, that would be useful behavior. –  supercat Dec 6 '12 at 0:17
    
@supercat I think that's what i would use an abstract base class for, since that is part of the implementation, and that's not what interfaces are for. –  Botz3000 Dec 6 '12 at 7:36

A private member makes no sense as part of an interface. An interface is there to define a set of methods, a role, an object must always implement. Private methods, on the other hand, are implementation details, not intended for public consumption.

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7  
You can't. Specifying an access modifier (private or public) results in a compilation error. –  JulianR Sep 5 '09 at 15:08
    
Thanks, that rings a bell. –  Kim Gräsman Sep 5 '09 at 15:17
    
Interfaces should be seen as a mechanism to enforce the contract a class makes towards users of the class. It guarantees that X,Y,Z,... methods will always be available to be used by external users of the class. What is annoying though, is that sometimes, you want to save yourself the trouble of implementing methods that you want programmers of the class to have access to when implementing the class itself. You can do this by inheriting another concrete or abstract class, but because C# doesn't support multiple inheritance, you can not mix and match, so you'll need to resort to composition. –  didibus Apr 24 at 19:02

An interface cannot contain private fields. However, the closest behavior to "private fields" you can achieve is by using explicit implementation (explained here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173157.aspx)

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Rule of interface

The CLR also allows an interface to contain static
methods, static fields, constants, and static constructors. However, a CLS-compliant
interface must not have any of these static members because some programming languages
aren’t able to define or access them. In fact, C# prevents an interface from defining any
static members. In addition, the CLR doesn’t allow an interface to contain any instance fields
or instance constructors.

These are the rules of interface you cant do anything on that :)

these are not allowed

interface IIValidationCRUD
{
    static ICRUDValidation IsValid(object obj); //error
}

interface IIValidationCRUD
{
    public ICRUDValidation IsValid(object obj); //error
}
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You should probably check out the MSDN article here about interfaces: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173156.aspx

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