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I have a scenario where i would like to change the primary key name in an entity and be able to run update-database -force. See below for code and error getting when i try.

Entity was:

public class Team
{
    [Key]
    [HiddenInput(DisplayValue = false)]
    public virtual int Id { get; set; }

    [Display(Name = "Full Name:")]
    public virtual string Name { get; set; }
}

Entity Changed to:

public class Team
{
    [Key]
    [HiddenInput(DisplayValue = false)]
    public virtual int TeamId { get; set; }

    [Display(Name = "Full Name:")]
    public virtual string Name { get; set; }
}

When i run Update-database -Force i get the following error.

Multiple identity columns specified for table 'Teams'. Only one identity column per table is allowed.

Its a matter of naming convention and i need this to be TeamId when i reference it latter, simply Id conflicts with child entity classes.

Any ideas on how i can do this successfully?

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1  
You could map TeamId to the primary key Id with [Column("Id")] attribute or do both the column name and the POCO variable need to be named TeamId? –  Marvin Rounce Dec 12 '12 at 7:20
    
@marvc1 I am trying your suggestion, i will inform you in a minute –  Komengem Dec 12 '12 at 7:43
    
@marvc1 hey buddy, your suggestion seems to be working and i see that you gave an answer below. –  Komengem Dec 12 '12 at 8:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Depends on the version of EF you are using. Even with migrations the result that you will see is something like:

"drop column Id " and "add column TeamId".

With this you will lose all values and "child connections"......

The only "secure" solution I am seeing at this point is a mix of Migrations and "hand SQL operations".

EASY solution:

1- taking in consideration that you already have a "base" migration creating the table with ID, now create the new migration with the "update". Now do NOT run it yet.

2- Open that file and write a new line BEFORE the generated lines and use a SQL command, something like this:

     SQL("ALTER TABLE table_name RENAME COLUMN old_name to new_name;");

This will change the name BEFORE the migration deletes the column and create a new one, what will happen is: you change the name before the delete, then the delete is executed but it will "fail" but it will not hurt nothing.

But now you ask: why do I do this? well if you are using migrations even if you delete the lines to delete the column and create a new one, the next time you create automatically a new migration file this new lines will be there...... this is why.

UPDATED ANSWERS #1

When I talk about Entity Framework Migrations I am referring to this: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/adonet/archive/2012/02/09/ef-4-3-code-based-migrations-walkthrough.aspx When you Run the ‘Add-Migration AddBlogUrl’ command in Package Manager Console, a new file (*.cs) is created.

Example of this file migration file with SQL commands:

public partial class AddAbsencesTypesAndCategories : DbMigration
    {
        public override void Up()
        {
            CreateTable(
                "pvw_AbsenceType",
                c => new
                    {
                        Id = c.Int(nullable: false, identity: true),
                        Name = c.String(nullable: false),
                        CountAsVacation = c.Boolean(nullable: false),
                        IsIncremental = c.Boolean(nullable: false),
                    })
                .PrimaryKey(t => t.Id);

          .....

            AddColumn("pvw_Absence", "CategoryId", c => c.Int(nullable: false));
                        AddForeignKey("pvw_Absence", "StatusId", "pvw_AbsenceStatusType", "Id");
            AddForeignKey("pvw_Absence", "CategoryId", "pvw_AbsenceType", "Id");
            CreateIndex("pvw_Absence", "StatusId");
            CreateIndex("pvw_Absence", "CategoryId");
            DropColumn("pvw_Absence", "MainCategoryId");
            DropColumn("pvw_Absence", "SubCategoryId");
           ......
            Sql(@"
                                        SET IDENTITY_INSERT [dbo].[pvw_AbsenceStatusType] ON
                    INSERT pvw_AbsenceStatusType (Id, Name) VALUES (1, N'Entwurf')                       
                                        SET IDENTITY_INSERT [dbo].[pvw_AbsenceStatusType] OFF
            ");    
            .....
        }

        public override void Down()
        {
            ........
        }
share|improve this answer
    
I can get this idea to work, in statement 2 when you say open that file, what file are you referring to? Nomarlly i would run that SQL statement in SQL Server Management Studio but it doesn't seem to find my intended database. –  Komengem Dec 12 '12 at 8:17
    
When I talk about Entity Framework Migrations I am referring to this: blogs.msdn.com/b/adonet/archive/2012/02/09/… When you Run the ‘Add-Migration AddBlogUrl’ command in Package Manager Console, a new file (*.cs) is created. –  Dryadwoods Dec 12 '12 at 8:19
    
Not sure EF5 creates this file because i can't find, unless i am supposed to create it myself. EF5 creates a Configuration.cs in the Migration folder. This file has an internal sealed class which has its pconstructor and a seed method. –  Komengem Dec 12 '12 at 8:34
    
I now understand this, so marking it as answer –  Komengem Jan 15 '13 at 9:50
    
@KomengeMwandila Thanks :) –  Dryadwoods Jan 15 '13 at 10:05

Easiest solution is to not rename the primary key in the database and instead map your class to your primary key and give it any name you want. Like this:

public class Team
{
    [Key]
    [HiddenInput(DisplayValue = false)]
    [Column("Id")] //this attribute maps TeamId to the column Id in the database
    public virtual int TeamId { get; set; }

    [Display(Name = "Full Name:")]
    public virtual string Name { get; set; }
}

Personally, I would keep the class name as Id. The naming convention [TableName + Id] is old school and overkill for a primary key (for a foreign key it is good). To me it just adds noise to your lines of code. team.TeamId is no better than team.Id.

share|improve this answer
    
It is a nice solution only if you do not care about the names in the Database. –  Dryadwoods Dec 12 '12 at 8:06
    
@emanyalpsid that is what i am worrying about now, code ran successfully but names in the database remains as before, Not sure i like that idea. I am now considering dropping the database and re-creating it again, beside with code first migration enabled, shouldn't take long. –  Komengem Dec 12 '12 at 8:10
    
If you are not worried about the data in the database then just drop it and recreate it. –  Marvin Rounce Dec 12 '12 at 8:32
    
@marvc1 Doing so now, it can't hurt to do some more data entry than waste more time trying a cheaper way around it. Your suggestion works though, but not the way i would like it. –  Komengem Dec 12 '12 at 8:38
    
You can always use the seed method to create sample data, then each time you drop a database you don't have to manually recreate it. –  Marvin Rounce Dec 12 '12 at 8:46

After fiddling with suggestion by both marvc1 and emanyalpsid. I decided to just drop the database and creating it again. This is done by simply deleting the database under Server Explorer in VS2012, and also make sure that the .mdf file under App_Data is also deleted. The .mdf file is usually hidden, to see it just under Solution Explorer toolbar click on Show All Files and you will see it. when those steps are done, simply run the code below in Package Manager Console:

update-database -Verbose

-Verbose simply lets you verify what you are creating.

marvc1's Answer

Works just fine, except it does not change names in the database, if you are not too worried about database names, it is the safest way to go about it. By names in the database i mean, In the entity Team, Id would still be Id and not TeamId

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