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I have been using TPL Dataflow quite a bit but am stumbling about an issue that I cannot resolve:

I have the following architecture:

BroadCastBlock<List<object1>> -> 2 different TransformBlock<List<Object1>, Tuple<int, List<Object1>>> -> both link to TransformManyBlock<Tuple<int, List<Object1>>, Object2>

I vary the lambda expression within the TransformManyBlock in the end of chain: (a) code that performs operations on the streamed tuple, (b) no code at all.

Within the TransformBlocks I measure the time starting from the arrival of the first item and stopping when TransformBlock.Completion indicates the block completed (broadCastBlock links to transfrom blocks with propagateCompletion set to true).

What I cannot reconcile is why the transformBlocks in the case of (b) complete about 5-6 times faster than with (a). This completely goes against the intent of the whole TDF design intentions. The items from the transform blocks were passed on to the transfromManyBlock, thus it should not matter at all what the transformManyBlock does to the items that influences when the transform blocks complete. I do not see a single reason why anything that goes on in the transfromManyBlock may have a bearing on the preceding TransformBlocks.

Anyone who can reconcile this weird observation?

Here is some code to show the difference. When running the code make sure to change the following two lines from:

        tfb1.transformBlock.LinkTo(transformManyBlock);
        tfb2.transformBlock.LinkTo(transformManyBlock);

to:

        tfb1.transformBlock.LinkTo(transformManyBlockEmpty);
        tfb2.transformBlock.LinkTo(transformManyBlockEmpty);

in order to observe the difference in runtime of the preceding transformBlocks.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Test test = new Test();
        test.Start();
    }
}

class Test
{
    private const int numberTransformBlocks = 2;
    private int currentGridPointer;
    private Dictionary<int, List<Tuple<int, List<Object1>>>> grid;

    private BroadcastBlock<List<Object1>> broadCastBlock;
    private TransformBlockClass tfb1;
    private TransformBlockClass tfb2;

    private TransformManyBlock<Tuple<int, List<Object1>>, Object2> 
               transformManyBlock;
    private TransformManyBlock<Tuple<int, List<Object1>>, Object2> 
               transformManyBlockEmpty;
    private ActionBlock<Object2> actionBlock;

    public Test()
    {
        grid = new Dictionary<int, List<Tuple<int, List<Object1>>>>();

        broadCastBlock = new BroadcastBlock<List<Object1>>(list => list);

        tfb1 = new TransformBlockClass();
        tfb2 = new TransformBlockClass();

        transformManyBlock = new TransformManyBlock<Tuple<int, List<Object1>>, Object2>
                (newTuple =>
            {
                for (int counter = 1; counter <= 10000000;  counter++)
                {
                    double result = Math.Sqrt(counter + 1.0);
                }

                return new Object2[0];

            });

        transformManyBlockEmpty 
            = new TransformManyBlock<Tuple<int, List<Object1>>, Object2>(
                  tuple =>
            {
                return new Object2[0];
            });

        actionBlock = new ActionBlock<Object2>(list =>
            {
                int tester = 1;
                //flush transformManyBlock
            });

        //linking
        broadCastBlock.LinkTo(tfb1.transformBlock
                              , new DataflowLinkOptions 
                                  { PropagateCompletion = true }
                              );
        broadCastBlock.LinkTo(tfb2.transformBlock
                              , new DataflowLinkOptions 
                                  { PropagateCompletion = true }
                              );

        //link either to ->transformManyBlock or -> transformManyBlockEmpty
        tfb1.transformBlock.LinkTo(transformManyBlock);
        tfb2.transformBlock.LinkTo(transformManyBlock);

        transformManyBlock.LinkTo(actionBlock
                                  , new DataflowLinkOptions 
                                       { PropagateCompletion = true }
                                  );
        transformManyBlockEmpty.LinkTo(actionBlock
                                       , new DataflowLinkOptions 
                                            { PropagateCompletion = true }
                                       );

        //completion
        Task.WhenAll(tfb1.transformBlock.Completion
                     , tfb2.transformBlock.Completion)
                       .ContinueWith(_ =>
            {
                transformManyBlockEmpty.Complete();
                transformManyBlock.Complete();
            });

        transformManyBlock.Completion.ContinueWith(_ =>
            {
                Console.WriteLine("TransformManyBlock (with code) completed");
            });

        transformManyBlockEmpty.Completion.ContinueWith(_ =>
        {
            Console.WriteLine("TransformManyBlock (empty) completed");
        });

    }

    public void Start()
    {
        const int numberBlocks = 100;
        const int collectionSize = 300000;


        //send collection numberBlock-times
        for (int i = 0; i < numberBlocks; i++)
        {
            List<Object1> list = new List<Object1>();
            for (int j = 0; j < collectionSize; j++)
            {
                list.Add(new Object1(j));
            }

            broadCastBlock.Post(list);
        }

        //mark broadCastBlock complete
        broadCastBlock.Complete();

        Console.WriteLine("Core routine finished");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

class TransformBlockClass
{
    private Stopwatch watch;
    private bool isStarted;
    private int currentIndex;

    public TransformBlock<List<Object1>, Tuple<int, List<Object1>>> transformBlock;

    public TransformBlockClass()
    {
        isStarted = false;
        watch = new Stopwatch();

        transformBlock = new TransformBlock<List<Object1>, Tuple<int, List<Object1>>>
           (list =>
        {
            if (!isStarted)
            {
                StartUp();
                isStarted = true;
            }

            return new Tuple<int, List<Object1>>(currentIndex++, list);
        });

        transformBlock.Completion.ContinueWith(_ =>
            {
                ShutDown();
            });
    }

    private void StartUp()
    {
        watch.Start();
    }

    private void ShutDown()
    {
        watch.Stop();

        Console.WriteLine("TransformBlock : Time elapsed in ms: " 
                              + watch.ElapsedMilliseconds);
    }
}

class Object1
{
    public int val { get; private set; }

    public Object1(int val)
    {
        this.val = val;
    }
}

class Object2
{
    public int value { get; private set; }
    public List<Object1> collection { get; private set; }

    public Object2(int value, List<Object1> collection)
    {
        this.value = value;
        this.collection = collection;
    }    
}

*EDIT: I posted another code piece, this time using collections of value types and I cannot reproduce the problem I am observing in above code. Could it be that passing around reference types and operating on them concurrently (even within different data flow blocks) could block and cause contention? *

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Test test = new Test();
        test.Start();
    }
}

class Test
{
    private BroadcastBlock<List<int>> broadCastBlock;
    private TransformBlock<List<int>, List<int>> tfb11;
    private TransformBlock<List<int>, List<int>> tfb12;
    private TransformBlock<List<int>, List<int>> tfb21;
    private TransformBlock<List<int>, List<int>> tfb22;
    private TransformManyBlock<List<int>, List<int>> transformManyBlock1;
    private TransformManyBlock<List<int>, List<int>> transformManyBlock2;
    private ActionBlock<List<int>> actionBlock1;
    private ActionBlock<List<int>> actionBlock2;

    public Test()
    {
        broadCastBlock = new BroadcastBlock<List<int>>(item => item);

        tfb11 = new TransformBlock<List<int>, List<int>>(item =>
            {
                return item;
            });

        tfb12 = new TransformBlock<List<int>, List<int>>(item =>
            {
                return item;
            });

        tfb21 = new TransformBlock<List<int>, List<int>>(item =>
            {
                return item;
            });

        tfb22 = new TransformBlock<List<int>, List<int>>(item =>
            {
                return item;
            });

        transformManyBlock1 = new TransformManyBlock<List<int>, List<int>>(item =>
            {
                Thread.Sleep(100);
                //or you can replace the Thread.Sleep(100) with actual work, 
                //no difference in results. This shows that the issue at hand is 
                //unrelated to starvation of threads.

                return new List<int>[1] { item };
            });

        transformManyBlock2 = new TransformManyBlock<List<int>, List<int>>(item =>
            {
                return new List<int>[1] { item };
            });

        actionBlock1 = new ActionBlock<List<int>>(item =>
            {
                //flush transformManyBlock
            });

        actionBlock2 = new ActionBlock<List<int>>(item =>
        {
            //flush transformManyBlock
        });

        //linking
        broadCastBlock.LinkTo(tfb11, new DataflowLinkOptions 
                                      { PropagateCompletion = true });
        broadCastBlock.LinkTo(tfb12, new DataflowLinkOptions 
                                      { PropagateCompletion = true });
        broadCastBlock.LinkTo(tfb21, new DataflowLinkOptions 
                                      { PropagateCompletion = true });
        broadCastBlock.LinkTo(tfb22, new DataflowLinkOptions 
                                      { PropagateCompletion = true });

        tfb11.LinkTo(transformManyBlock1);
        tfb12.LinkTo(transformManyBlock1);
        tfb21.LinkTo(transformManyBlock2);
        tfb22.LinkTo(transformManyBlock2);

        transformManyBlock1.LinkTo(actionBlock1
                                   , new DataflowLinkOptions 
                                     { PropagateCompletion = true }
                                   );
        transformManyBlock2.LinkTo(actionBlock2
                                   , new DataflowLinkOptions 
                                     { PropagateCompletion = true }
                                   );

        //completion
        Task.WhenAll(tfb11.Completion, tfb12.Completion).ContinueWith(_ =>
            {
                Console.WriteLine("TransformBlocks 11 and 12 completed");
                transformManyBlock1.Complete();
            });

        Task.WhenAll(tfb21.Completion, tfb22.Completion).ContinueWith(_ =>
            {
                Console.WriteLine("TransformBlocks 21 and 22 completed");
                transformManyBlock2.Complete();
            });

        transformManyBlock1.Completion.ContinueWith(_ =>
            {
                Console.WriteLine
                    ("TransformManyBlock (from tfb11 and tfb12) finished");
            });

        transformManyBlock2.Completion.ContinueWith(_ =>
            {
                Console.WriteLine
                    ("TransformManyBlock (from tfb21 and tfb22) finished");
            });
    }

    public void Start()
    {
        const int numberBlocks = 100;
        const int collectionSize = 300000;

        //send collection numberBlock-times
        for (int i = 0; i < numberBlocks; i++)
        {
            List<int> list = new List<int>();
            for (int j = 0; j < collectionSize; j++)
            {
                list.Add(j);
            }

            broadCastBlock.Post(list);
        }

        //mark broadCastBlock complete
        broadCastBlock.Complete();

        Console.WriteLine("Core routine finished");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Thanks, will take a look at it now. –  casperOne Dec 13 '12 at 12:46
    
@casperOne, I added another piece of code, this time using collections of value types, could it be that concurrently accessing ref types (even within different data flow blocks) causes blocking and thus contention which could sign responsible for the delays even in data blocks that are "higher up the food chain"? –  Matt Wolf Dec 14 '12 at 9:58
    
Arrgh, can't test. Won't have access to TPL dataflow until Monday at the earliest (machine with VS.NET 2012 blew out).... I'm trying! –  casperOne Dec 14 '12 at 17:30
    
@casperOne, no worries, I forgot to add that the second piece of code causes both transformManyBlocks to complete at about the same time no matter how much work is performed within each block. I fail to see what is different between the first code base and second one that may explain the holdup of task completion in the first code base. –  Matt Wolf Dec 16 '12 at 9:10

1 Answer 1

Okay, final attempt ;-)

Synopsis:

The observed time delta in scenario 1 can be fully explained by differing behavior of the garbage collector.

When running scenario 1 linking the transformManyBlocks, the runtime behavior is such that garbage collections are triggered during the creation of new items (Lists) on the main thread, which is not the case when running scenario 1 with the transformManyBlockEmptys linked.

Note that creating a new reference type instance (Object1) results in a call to allocate memory in the GC heap which in turn may trigger a GC collection run. As quite a few Object1 instances (and lists) are created, the garbage collector has quite a bit more work to do scanning the heap for (potentially) unreachable objects.

Therefore the observed difference can be minimized by any of the following:

  • Turning Object1 from a class to a struct (thereby ensuring that memory for the instances is not allocated on the heap).
  • Keeping a reference to the generated lists (thereby reducing the time the garbage collector needs to identify unreachable objects).
  • Generating all the items before posting them to the network.

(Note: I cannot explain why the garbage collector behaves differently in scenario 1 "transformManyBlock" vs. scenario 1 "transformManyBlockEmpty", but data collected via the ConcurrencyVisualizer clearly shows the difference.)

Results:

(Tests were run on a Core i7 980X, 6 cores, HT enabled):

I modified scenario 2 as follows:

// Start a stopwatch per tfb
int tfb11Cnt = 0;
Stopwatch sw11 = new Stopwatch();
tfb11 = new TransformBlock<List<int>, List<int>>(item =>
{
    if (Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref tfb11Cnt, 1, 0) == 0)
        sw11.Start();

    return item;
});

// [...]

// completion
Task.WhenAll(tfb11.Completion, tfb12.Completion).ContinueWith(_ =>
{

     Console.WriteLine("TransformBlocks 11 and 12 completed. SW11: {0}, SW12: {1}",
     sw11.ElapsedMilliseconds, sw12.ElapsedMilliseconds);
     transformManyBlock1.Complete();
});

Results:

  1. Scenario 1 (as posted, i.e. linked to transformManyBlock):
    TransformBlock : Time elapsed in ms: 6826
    TransformBlock : Time elapsed in ms: 6826
  2. Scenario 1 (linked to transformManyBlockEmpty):
    TransformBlock : Time elapsed in ms: 3140
    TransformBlock : Time elapsed in ms: 3140
  3. Scenario 1 (transformManyBlock, Thread.Sleep(200) in loop body):
    TransformBlock : Time elapsed in ms: 4949
    TransformBlock : Time elapsed in ms: 4950
  4. Scenario 2 (as posted but modified to report times):
    TransformBlocks 21 and 22 completed. SW21: 619 ms, SW22: 669 ms
    TransformBlocks 11 and 12 completed. SW11: 669 ms, SW12: 667 ms

Next, I changed scenario 1 and 2 to prepare the input data prior to posting it to the network:

// Scenario 1
//send collection numberBlock-times
var input = new List<List<Object1>>(numberBlocks);
for (int i = 0; i < numberBlocks; i++)
{
    var list = new List<Object1>(collectionSize);
    for (int j = 0; j < collectionSize; j++)
    {
        list.Add(new Object1(j));
    }
    input.Add(list);
}

foreach (var inp in input)
{
    broadCastBlock.Post(inp);
    Thread.Sleep(10);
}

// Scenario 2
//send collection numberBlock-times
var input = new List<List<int>>(numberBlocks);
for (int i = 0; i < numberBlocks; i++)
{
    List<int> list = new List<int>(collectionSize);
    for (int j = 0; j < collectionSize; j++)
    {
        list.Add(j);
    }

    //broadCastBlock.Post(list);
    input.Add(list);
 }

 foreach (var inp in input)
 {
     broadCastBlock.Post(inp);
     Thread.Sleep(10);
 }

Results:

  1. Scenario 1 (transformManyBlock):
    TransformBlock : Time elapsed in ms: 1029
    TransformBlock : Time elapsed in ms: 1029
  2. Scenario 1 (transformManyBlockEmpty):
    TransformBlock : Time elapsed in ms: 975
    TransformBlock : Time elapsed in ms: 975
  3. Scenario 1 (transformManyBlock, Thread.Sleep(200) in loop body):
    TransformBlock : Time elapsed in ms: 972
    TransformBlock : Time elapsed in ms: 972

Finally, I changed the code back to the original version, but keeping a reference to the created list around:

var lists = new List<List<Object1>>();
for (int i = 0; i < numberBlocks; i++)
{
    List<Object1> list = new List<Object1>();
    for (int j = 0; j < collectionSize; j++)
    {
        list.Add(new Object1(j));
    }
    lists.Add(list);                
    broadCastBlock.Post(list);
}

Results:

  1. Scenario 1 (transformManyBlock):
    TransformBlock : Time elapsed in ms: 6052
    TransformBlock : Time elapsed in ms: 6052
  2. Scenario 1 (transformManyBlockEmpty):
    TransformBlock : Time elapsed in ms: 5524
    TransformBlock : Time elapsed in ms: 5524
  3. Scenario 1 (transformManyBlock, Thread.Sleep(200) in loop body):
    TransformBlock : Time elapsed in ms: 5098
    TransformBlock : Time elapsed in ms: 5098

Likewise, changing Object1 from a class to a struct results in both blocks to complete at about the same time (and about 10x faster).


Update: Below answer does not suffice to explain the behavior observed.

In scenario one a tight loop is executed inside the TransformMany lambda, which will hog the CPU and will starve other threads for processor resources. That's the reason why a delay in the execution of the Completion continuation task can be observed. In scenario two a Thread.Sleep is executed inside the TransformMany lambda giving other threads the chance to execute the Completion continuation task. The observed difference in runtime behavior is not related to TPL Dataflow. To improve the observed deltas it should suffice to introduce a Thread.Sleep inside the loop's body in scenario 1:

for (int counter = 1; counter <= 10000000;  counter++)
{
   double result = Math.Sqrt(counter + 1.0);
   // Back off for a little while
   Thread.Sleep(200);
}

(Below is my original answer. I didn't read the OP's question careful enough, and only understood what he was asking about after having read his comments. I still leave it here as a reference.)

Are you sure that you are measuring the right thing? Note that when you do something like this: transformBlock.Completion.ContinueWith(_ => ShutDown()); then your time measurement will be influenced by the behavior of the TaskScheduler (e.g. how long it takes until the continuation task starts executing). Although I was not able to observe the difference you saw on my machine I got preciser results (in terms of the delta between tfb1 and tfb2 completion times) when using dedicated threads for measuring time:

       // Within your Test.Start() method...
       Thread timewatch = new Thread(() =>
       {
           var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
           tfb1.transformBlock.Completion.Wait();
           Console.WriteLine("tfb1.transformBlock completed within {0} ms",
                              sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
        });

        Thread timewatchempty = new Thread(() =>
        {
            var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            tfb2.transformBlock.Completion.Wait();
            Console.WriteLine("tfb2.transformBlock completed within {0} ms", 
                               sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
        });

        timewatch.Start();
        timewatchempty.Start();

        //send collection numberBlock-times
        for (int i = 0; i < numberBlocks; i++)
        {
          // ... rest of the code
share|improve this answer
    
I cannot use dedicated tasks because in the end there will be many more transformBlocks and using dedicated tasks will starve the CPU. I am aware of the timing issues you brought up and tasks scheduler, however I am exactly interested about this, the delta between completion of tfb1 and tfb2. The results are consistent thus I can say with certainty that the transfromMany blocks' behavior in code base 1 DO INFLUENCE the completion times of the transform blocks that precede them. Thus I appreciate your code but it does not really help solve my problem. –  Matt Wolf Dec 20 '12 at 10:36
    
Also note that there is no delta to be observed in code base 2 which entirely consists of value types. Thus this is not a problem of the tasks scheduler or bad ways of measuring completion time. –  Matt Wolf Dec 20 '12 at 10:37
    
Ah, so you want to know when the continuation tasks after the blocks have completed start executing? But this is not directly related to TPL Dataflow. I have only tested the first example btw. –  afrischke Dec 20 '12 at 10:47
    
No, I want to know why the transformBlocks in code base 1 complete at entirely different times depending on the work overhead in the transformManyBlock, while they complete at identical times in code base 2. Question: Why does work in transformManyBlock impact the completion times of transformBlocks, and why only in code base 1 but not code base 2. Its a directly related TPL Dataflow question. –  Matt Wolf Dec 20 '12 at 13:06
1  
Same reason: Your code is thrashing the processor(s) while it executes the tight for-loop. In between the thread scheduler decides that one of the scheduled completion tasks gets to run, then it grants the busy thread(s) that execute the loop more cpu time. Then some times later it decides that the other scheduled completion tasks should run, so it does. In scenario 2 on the other hand, nothing is going on, the thread(s) that execute the TransformMany lambda are just sleeping, so the thread scheduler decides that the completion tasks may run immediately. –  afrischke Dec 20 '12 at 13:16

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