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I'm reading a book called Clean Code -A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship written by Robert C. Martin and in his book he gives a lot of useful tips how to write good Java code.

And one of those tips is:

Blocks within if statements, else statements, for statements, and so on should be one line long. Probably that line should be a function call. Not only does this keep the enclosing function small, but it also adds documentary value because the function called within the block can have a nicely descriptive name

For me that was very strange hint, because from this code:

public Map<String, List<Issue>> mapComponentToIssueList(List<Issue> issues) {
    Map<String, List<Issue>> map = new HashMap<String, List<Issue>>();

    for (Issue issue : issues) {
        String componentName = issue.getComponents().iterator().next().getString("name");
        if (map.containsKey(componentName)) {
            map.get(componentName).add(issue);
        } else {
            List<Issue> list = new ArrayList<Issue>();
            list.add(issue);
            map.put(componentName, list);
        }
    }
    return map;

}

Using this principle I've got this:

public Map<String, List<Issue>> mapComponentToIssueList(List<Issue> issues) {
    Map<String, List<Issue>> componentNameIssueListMap = new HashMap<String, List<Issue>>();
    for (Issue issue : issues) {
        populateMapWithComponenNamesAndIssueLists(componentNameIssueListMap, issue);
    }
    return componentNameIssueListMap;
}

private void populateMapWithComponenNamesAndIssueLists(Map<String, List<Issue>> componentNameIssueListMap, Issue issue) {
    String componentName = getFirstComponentName(issue);
    if (componentNameIssueListMap.containsKey(componentName)) {
        componentNameIssueListMap.get(componentName).add(issue);
    } else {
        putIssueListWithNewKeyToMap(componentNameIssueListMap, issue, componentName);
    }
}

private void putIssueListWithNewKeyToMap(Map<String, List<Issue>> componentNameIssueListMap, Issue issue, String componentName) {
    List<Issue> list = new ArrayList<Issue>();
    list.add(issue);
    componentNameIssueListMap.put(componentName, list);
}

private String getFirstComponentName(Issue issue) {
    return issue.getComponents().iterator().next().getString("name");
}

So basically the code has doubled in size.Was it useful? - Maybe.

What code in my example is so called clean? What am I doing wrong? What do you guys think about this?

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by Tim, Brian Roach, gnat, Ragunath Jawahar, mu is too short Dec 12 '12 at 8:52

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7  
IMHO, that advice is bordering on ridiculous. –  NPE Dec 12 '12 at 7:24
4  
Please throw out that book. Or burn it. (The latter is safer; no one else will ever be able to read it). –  Brian Roach Dec 12 '12 at 7:24
2  
Oh no, it has relevance in that some day I might have to untangle a mess written by someone who did it. Burn it :-D –  Brian Roach Dec 12 '12 at 7:34
1  
+1 for the burning, I read that darn book as well and I'm still having nightmares –  Scorpio Dec 12 '12 at 7:48
1  
I was young and dumb. Also: alcohol. :) Its the Necronomicon in disguise, Iä, Iä, Clean Code. –  Scorpio Dec 12 '12 at 10:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Frankly, I think the tip is silly because it's so extreme.

Personally, if I were to do anything to your function, I'd change it like so:

public Map<String, List<Issue>> mapComponentToIssueList(List<Issue> issues) {
    Map<String, List<Issue>> map = new HashMap<String, List<Issue>>();

    for (Issue issue : issues) {
        String componentName = issue.getComponents().iterator().next().getString("name");
        List<Issue> list = map.get(componentName);
        if (list == null) {
            list = new ArrayList<Issue>();
            map.put(componentName, list);
        }
        list.add(issue);
    }
    return map;
}

The benefits are:

  1. You only do the map lookup once instead of twice.
  2. The list.add() call is not duplicated in two places.

Now if you wanted to factor something out, the following would be a good candidate:

        List<Issue> list = map.get(componentName);
        if (list == null) {
            list = new ArrayList<Issue>();
            map.put(componentName, list);
        }

I would definitely do it if the above appeared in more than one place. Otherwise, probably not (at least not initially).

share|improve this answer

I think it makes more sense to simplify the condition itself. Than the content of the if block, i.e.

public void method(){
...
  if( mycondition1 && mycondition2 && mycondition3 && mycondition4 && mycondition5 && mycondition6 && mycondition7 && mycondition8 ) {
   dosomething();
  }
...
}

becomes

public void method(){
...
  if( conditionsAreTrue() ) {
   dosomething();
  }
...
}

boolean conditionsAreTrue(){
return  mycondition1 && mycondition2 && mycondition3 && mycondition4 && mycondition5 && mycondition6 && mycondition7 && mycondition8;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I can't read the book author's mind, but I doubt this is what he meant. Among other things, he is talking about "blocks ... within else statements". –  NPE Dec 12 '12 at 7:31
    
I guess it makes sense in term of reducing complexity but that should be true for any block of code, not just if statement. If a block of code is not straight forward, then extracting it in a method makes the code easier to read and understand. –  emt14 Dec 12 '12 at 7:41

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