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Is it possible to use Generic mechanism within function body?

for exammple

if (!(someClass is IClass<T, G> where T : someInterface, G : anotherInterface))
{
    return;
 }

or do casting like this:

var v = (IClass <T, G> where T : someInterface, G: anotherInterface)something;
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The code is nonsensical. You cannot have instances of open types. –  leppie Dec 12 '12 at 8:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can do this, but you have to make sure your interface is covariant:

interface IClass<out T, out S>
{
    // Methods that can return a T or S but not accept one as input
}

By marking the type parameters as out, you are basically saying "I will only ever get a T or an S out of this interface". For example, IEnumerable<out T> as you can only get a T out of it, but only List<T> because you can put a T into a list as well as get one out.

Having defined your interface as such, an IClass<string, string> is an IClass<object, object>: you know your IClass<string, string> will only ever give you a string, but since a string is an object then that's fine, and if you assign it to an IClass<object, object> you know it will only ever give you an object.

(You can't do this if you interface allows you to put a T or an S into something. If this was the case, and you assigned your IClass<string, string> to an IClass<object, object>, you could try to put an int into it and it would fail, because the underlying class only really accepts a string.)

What this then lets you do is

if (!(something is IClass<object, object>))
{
    return;
}

or

var v = (IClass<object, object>)something;

and both will work if something is actually an object that implements, say, IClass<string, string>.

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This answer really helped me understand that out keyword, which Ive always struggled with. +1 –  Jamiec Dec 12 '12 at 8:48

For the first example, yes - you just need to specify the types:

if (!(someClass is IClass<ISomeInterface, IAnotherInterface>))
{
    return;
 }

The other is muct the same:

var v = (IClass <ISomeInterface, IAnotherInterface>)something;

Although its probably better to use as

var v = something as IClass <ISomeInterface, IAnotherInterface>;
if(v != null)
{
    // Do something.
}

The second line above is important - by using as in place of a direct cast you wont get an InvalidCastException if it fails, but v will be null if the cast using as fails. This technique gives you a little more control over failure if your attempt to cast is invalid. (Consider why the conversion would be invalid: if that represents a situation where you know longer know what the world looks like, the InvalidCastException is probably the correct approach. If it's reasonable for the object not to be an instance of the interface, then as is your friend.)

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2  
It's not generally better to use as than a cast. It depends on whether a conversion failure represents an error which should logically cause an exception or not. –  Jon Skeet Dec 12 '12 at 8:10
    
@JonSkeet needs an "or worse" ;p –  Marc Gravell Dec 12 '12 at 8:11
    
Not entirely true. int[] would fullfill where T : IEnumerable but new List<IEnumerable>() is List<int[]> would be false –  Rune FS Dec 12 '12 at 8:13
    
Thanks - regarding --> if (!(someClass is IClass<ISomeInterface, IAnotherInterface>)) - can I change ISomeInterface to class and not interdace - and the derived class will work? I have a feeling it won't work. –  user1025852 Dec 12 '12 at 8:18
    
For a general interface IClass, someClass is IClass<ISomeInterface, IAnotherInterface> won't give true if someClass is actually an IClass<SomeInterfaceImpl, AnotherInterfaceImpl>. –  Rawling Dec 12 '12 at 8:38

you could try this:

if (!(someClass is IClass<someInterface, anotherInterface>)
{
    return;
}

or via reflection:

var t = someClass.GetType()
Type[] typeParameters = t.GetGenericArguments();
if (!typeParameters[0].IsSubclassOf(typeof(someInterface)) || 
    !typeParameters[1].IsSubclassOf(typeof(anotherInterface)))
{
    return;
}
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where constraints are to be applied to the generic method itself. You can use the desired types with no problem.

On a side note: don't check for false, it's more confusing on the long run.

if (someClass is IClass<someInterface, anotherInterface>)
{
    // your code
}
// else { return; } // no longer needed!

Expanding and enveloping the code in a generic method, it would look like this:

void myMethod<T, U>()
    where T : someInterface
    where U : anotherInterface
{
    if (someClass is IClass<T, U>)
    {
        // your code
    }
    // else { return; } // no longer needed!
}
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