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I have a third party .NET Assembly and a large Java application. I need to call mothods provided by the .NET class library from the Java application. The assembly is not COM-enabled. I have searched the net and so far i have the following:

C# code (cslib.cs):

using System;

namespace CSLib
{
    public class CSClass
    {
        public static void SayHi()
        {
            System.Console.WriteLine("Hi");
        }
    }
}

compiled with (using .net 3.5, but the same happens when 2.0 is used):

csc /target:library cslib.cs

C++ code (clib.cpp):

#include <jni.h>
#using <CSLib.dll>

using namespace CSLib;

extern "C" _declspec(dllexport) void Java_CallCS_callCS(JNIEnv* env, jclass cls) {
    CSLib::CSClass::SayHi();
}

compiled with (using VC 2008 tools, but the same happens when 2003 tools are used):

cl /clr /LD clib.cpp
mt -manifest clib.dll.manifest -outputresource:clib.dll;2

Java code (CallCS.java):

class CallCS {
    static {
       System.loadLibrary("clib");
    }
    private static native void callCS();
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        callCS();
    }
}

When I try to run the java class, the Java VM crashes while invoking the method (it is able to load the library):

#
# An unexpected error has been detected by Java Runtime Environment:
#
#  Internal Error (0xe0434f4d), pid=3144, tid=3484
#
# Java VM: Java HotSpot(TM) Client VM (10.0-b19 mixed mode, sharing windows-x86)
# Problematic frame:
# C  [kernel32.dll+0x22366]
#
...
Java frames: (J=compiled Java code, j=interpreted, Vv=VM code)
j  CallCS.callCS()V+0
j  CallCS.main([Ljava/lang/String;)V+0
v  ~StubRoutines::call_stub

However, if I create a plain cpp application that loads clib.dll and calls the exported function Java_CallCS_callCS, everything is OK. I have tried this on both x86 and x64 environments and the result is the same. I have not tried other versions of Java, but I need the code to run on 1.5.0.

Moreover, if I modify clib.cpp to call only System methods everything works fine even from Java:

#include <jni.h>
#using <mscorlib.dll>

using namespace System;

extern "C" _declspec(dllexport) void Java_CallCS_callCS(JNIEnv* env, jclass cls) {
    System::Console::WriteLine("It works");
}

To wrap up:

  1. I am ABLE to call System methods from Java -> clib.dll -> mscorlib.dll
  2. I am ABLE to call any methods from CPPApp -> clib.dll -> cslib.dll
  3. I am UNABLE to call any methods from Java -> clib.dll -> cslib.dll

I am aware of a workaround that uses 1. above - I can use reflection to load the assmebly and invoke desired methods using only System calls, but the code gets messy and I am hoping for a better solution.

I know about dotnetfromjava project, which uses the reflection method, but prefer not to add more complexity than needed. I'll use something like this if there is no other way, however.

I have looked at ikvm.net also, but my understanding is that it uses its own JVM (written in C#) to do the magic. However, running the entire Java application under its VM is no option for me.

Thanks.

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The C++ code is actually C++/CLI right? –  Gili Sep 25 '09 at 16:08
    
Yes, the /clr option is specified –  Kcats Oct 5 '09 at 8:47
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6 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

OK, the mystery is solved.

The JVM crash is caused by unhandled System.IO.FileNotFoundException. The exception is thrown because the .NET assembly is searched in the folder where the calling exe file resides.

  1. The mscorlib.dll is in the Global Assembly Cache, so it works.
  2. The CPP application exe is in the same folder as the assembly, so it works also.
  3. The cslib.dll assembly is NEITHER in the folder of java.exe, NOR in the GAC, so it doesn't work.

It seems my only option is to install the .NET assembly in GAC (the third-party dll does have a strong name).

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6  
Wow thanks for sharing this, I've been trying to figure out this exact same problem. I really wanted to avoid the GAC for various reasons, so I found a way to manually load the assemblies from the path of your choice using the AssemblyResolve event: devcity.net/Articles/254/1/.aspx. You have to handle this event in the C++/CLI layer since the C# assemblies won't have been loaded yet. Anyways, hopefully this will be helpful to another Googler... –  Jason Oct 15 '09 at 18:57
    
Thanks for sharing this, indeed I ended up using exactly the AssemblyResolve event, but forgot to update the answer. –  Kcats Oct 19 '09 at 8:21
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Look at jni4net, it will do the hard work for you.

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Wow. Nice! Thanks for the link. –  dthorpe Nov 29 '11 at 17:47
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Have you looked at ikvm.NET, which allows calls between .NET and Java code?

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I've the same problem and I got your same results:

I am ABLE to call System methods from Java -> clib.dll -> mscorlib.dll
I am ABLE to call any methods from CPPApp -> clib.dll -> cslib.dll
I am UNABLE to call any methods from Java -> clib.dll -> cslib.dll

I registered my Assembly (my dll) in the GAC (I can see it in the directory "C:\Windows\assembly"). But when I run my application I still getting the error:

C  [KERNELBASE.dll+0xb9bc]  RaiseException+0x58

In the Visual Studio I can see this error is the System.IO.FileNotFoundException. I think that this is because my c++ dll still can't find my C# dll in the GAC. ¿Could you give me one advice please?

share|improve this answer
    
I don't remember all details, but it is possible that you need to notify the cpp compiler that the referenced assembly is in the GAC (If you are using Visual Studio, make sure you have a reference to the GAC assembly, and not to a copy of the dll in some folder). Also try to use Process Monitor to see where the runtime looks for the assembly and if it actually finds it. If everything else fails, you can use the workaround described in the top comment of the accepted answer (the AssemblyResolve event). –  Kcats Dec 28 '11 at 8:34
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I was so glad to find this article since I got stuck and had exactly that problem. I want to contribute some code, which helps to overcome this problem. In your Java constructor call the init method, which adds the resolve event. My experience it is necessary to call init NOT just before the call into your library in c++ code, since due to timing problems it may crash nonetheless. I've put the init call into my java class constructor of mapping the JNI calls, which works great.

    //C# code
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Security.Permissions;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

namespace JNIBridge
{
    public class Temperature
    {

        [SecurityPermission(SecurityAction.Assert, Flags = SecurityPermissionFlag.UnmanagedCode | SecurityPermissionFlag.Assertion | SecurityPermissionFlag.Execution)]
        [ReflectionPermission(SecurityAction.Assert, Unrestricted = true)]
        [FileIOPermission(SecurityAction.Assert, Unrestricted = true)]

        public static double toFahrenheit(double value)
        {
            return (value * 9) / 5 + 32;
        }

        [SecurityPermission(SecurityAction.Assert, Flags = SecurityPermissionFlag.UnmanagedCode | SecurityPermissionFlag.Assertion | SecurityPermissionFlag.Execution)]
        [ReflectionPermission(SecurityAction.Assert, Unrestricted = true)]
        [FileIOPermission(SecurityAction.Assert, Unrestricted = true)]

        public static double toCelsius(double value)
        {
            return (value - 32) * 5 / 9; 
        }


    }
}

C++ Code

    // C++ Code

#include "stdafx.h"

#include "JNIMapper.h"
#include "DotNet.h"
#include "stdio.h"
#include "stdlib.h"

#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif
/*
 * Class:     DotNet
 * Method:    toFahrenheit
 * Signature: (D)D
 */

static bool initialized = false;
using namespace System;
using namespace System::Reflection;

/*** 
 This is procedure is always needed when the .NET dll's arent in the actual directory of the calling exe!!!
 It loads the needed assembly from a predefined path, if found in the directory and returns the assembly.
*/

Assembly ^OnAssemblyResolve(Object ^obj, ResolveEventArgs ^args)
{
    //System::Console::WriteLine("In OnAssemblyResolve");
#ifdef _DEBUG
            /// Change to your .NET DLL paths here
    String ^path = gcnew String("d:\\WORK\\JNIBridge\\x64\\Debug");
#else
    String ^path = gcnew String(_T("d:\\WORK\\JNIBridge\\x64\\Release"));
#endif
    array<String^>^ assemblies =
        System::IO::Directory::GetFiles(path, "*.dll");
    for (long ii = 0; ii < assemblies->Length; ii++) {
        AssemblyName ^name = AssemblyName::GetAssemblyName(assemblies[ii]);
        if (AssemblyName::ReferenceMatchesDefinition(gcnew AssemblyName(args->Name), name)) {
        //  System::Console::WriteLine("Try to resolve "+ name);
            Assembly ^a = Assembly::Load(name);
            //System::Console::WriteLine("Resolved "+ name);
            return a;
        }
    }
    return nullptr;
}

/**
 This procedure adds the Assembly resolve event handler
*/
void AddResolveEvent()
{
    AppDomain::CurrentDomain->AssemblyResolve +=
        gcnew ResolveEventHandler(OnAssemblyResolve);
}
/*
 * Class:     DotNet
 * Method:    init
 * Signature: ()Z
 */
JNIEXPORT jboolean JNICALL Java_DotNet_init
  (JNIEnv *, jobject)

{
    printf("In init\n");    
    AddResolveEvent();  
    printf("init - done.\n");   
    return true;

}

/*
 * Class:     DotNet
 * Method:    toFahrenheit
 * Signature: (D)D
 */

JNIEXPORT jdouble JNICALL Java_DotNet_toFahrenheit
  (JNIEnv * je, jobject jo, jdouble value)
{
    printf("In Java_DotNet_toFahrenheit\n");  

      double result = 47;

      try{        
          result = JNIBridge::Temperature::toFahrenheit(value);
      } catch (...){
          printf("Error caught");
      }
      return result;
}

/*
 * Class:     DotNet
 * Method:    toCelsius
 * Signature: (D)D
 */
JNIEXPORT jdouble JNICALL Java_DotNet_toCelsius
  (JNIEnv * je, jobject jo , jdouble value){

      printf("In Java_DotNet_toCelsius\n");

      double result = 11;

      try{

          result = JNIBridge::Temperature::toCelsius(value);
      } catch (...){
          printf("Error caught");
      }

      return result;
}


#ifdef __cplusplus

}

Java code

    /***
    ** Java class file
    **/
public class DotNet {    
    public native double toFahrenheit (double d);
    public native double toCelsius (double d);
    public native boolean init();

    static {
        try{            
            System.loadLibrary("JNIMapper");
        } catch(Exception ex){
            ex.printStackTrace();
        }
    }        

    public DotNet(){
        init();
    }

    public double fahrenheit (double v) {
        return toFahrenheit(v);
    }

    public double celsius (double v) {
        return toCelsius(v);
    }

}
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I would recommend also checking javOnet bridge that automates whole process and exposes simple API for JAVA developers. It's very light solution with one JAR file that covers all details of bridging JAVA and .NET. You just focus on calling your .NET methods like they were native JAVA object.

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