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I have a string and I need to select the last occurrence of the pattern. The string is:

[[[1302638400000.0, 0], [1302724800000.0, 610.64999999999998], [1302811200000.0, 2266.6500000000001], [1303156800000.0, 4916.9300000000003], [1303329600000.0, 6107.3199999999997], [1303934400000.0, 9114.6700000000001]], [[1302638400000.0, 20000.0], [1302724800000.0, 20000.0], [1302811200000.0, 20000.0], [1303156800000.0, 20000.0], [1303329600000.0, 20000.0], [1303934400000.0, 20000.0]], [[1302638400000.0, 20000.0], [1302724800000.0, 20610.650000000001], [1302811200000.0, 22266.650000000001], [1303156800000.0, 24916.93], [1303329600000.0, 26107.32], [1303934400000.0, 29114.669999999998], [1304452800000.0, 30078.23]], [[1302718580000.0, 0.0], [1302772440000.0, 3.0532500000000073], [1303107093000.0, 11.333250000000007], [1303107102000.0, 21.753250000000008], [1303352295000.0, 24.584650000000003], [1303352311000.0, 26.8766], [1303815010000.0, 30.536599999999996], [1303815028000.0, 27.703349999999993]]];

The pattern that I use is:

\s\[\[(.*?)\]\]

Which unfortunately selects only 1st occurrence. The highlighted text is the desired result. It doesn't matter how many square brackets at the end, just need the last array set.

UPDATE: If it can help you, then the coding is in c#

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1  
Any particular programming language? C#, Java? –  bonCodigo Dec 12 '12 at 9:04

4 Answers 4

Use the RightToLeft option:

Regex.Match(s, @"\[\[(.*?)\]\]", RegexOptions.RightToLeft)

This option is exclusive to the .NET regex flavor, and does exactly what you asked for: searches from the end of the input instead of the beginning. Of particular note, the non-greedy ? modifier works just as you expect; if you leave it off you'll get the whole input, but with it you get:

[[1302718580000.0, 0.0], [1302772440000.0, 3.0532500000000073], [1303107093000.0, 11.333250000000007], [1303107102000.0, 21.753250000000008], [1303352295000.0, 24.584650000000003], [1303352311000.0, 26.8766], [1303815010000.0, 30.536599999999996], [1303815028000.0, 27.703349999999993]]]

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1  
+1 for the RightToLeft option, wasn't aware of that feature. –  stema Dec 13 '12 at 7:21
    
Great, THANK YOU !!!! –  Vazgun Dec 13 '12 at 7:49

Do a greedy match up to the last set of [[ and capture..

.*(\[\[.*\]\])\];

See it here.

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Looks like it works for Ruby. I'm using c# and I'm using different website to check regex experssions: regexr.com?334dc and it selects the whole string unfortunately –  Vazgun Dec 12 '12 at 23:23
2  
The regex matches the whole string, but the part you're interested in is captured in group #1 (in C# you would use 'Group[1].Value` to extract it). This technique works in every flavor, but .NET also offers a neater option, as my answer explains. –  Alan Moore Dec 13 '12 at 4:45
    
@AlanMoore is correct, generally this is the only way to do it without being able to specify the occurrence (which is language specific). As the question had no reference to C# I could only provide the best language agnostic solution, in future be sure to add all relevant information to the question. +1 for RightToLeft. –  iiSeymour Dec 13 '12 at 10:01

Try adding the $ to your pattern like this \s\[\[(.*?)\]\]\]\;$ and let me know if it works.

Currently I don't have bash under hand so I cannot check but it should do the trick.

Edit : Right version \S+\s?+(?!((.*\[\[)))

which translates into :

\S   : all alfanumeric
\s?  : all 1 space occurences
?!   : not 
.*   : everything
\[\[ : until the last pattern of [[ (excluded)

Here is the Rubular example

BTW great tool rubular, make me wanna look more into ruby and regular expressions :D

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true, thought after ti unescape the ";" –  Lucian Enache Dec 12 '12 at 9:11
1  
Still over matches and bash isn't required to check as many site exists such rubular.com –  iiSeymour Dec 12 '12 at 9:18
    
nope, this one selects everything startig from the first occurrence on [[ –  Vazgun Dec 12 '12 at 23:19
    
Done fixed that :) –  Lucian Enache Dec 13 '12 at 13:30

There should be a global flag or a method that returns all matches in your language. Use this and take the last match.

In C# Matches() returns a MatchCollection containing all found matches. So you can do for example this:

string source = "[[[1302638400000.0, 0], [1302724800000.0, 610.64999999999998], [1302811200000.0, 2266.6500000000001], [1303156800000.0, 4916.9300000000003], [1303329600000.0, 6107.3199999999997], [1303934400000.0, 9114.6700000000001]], [[1302638400000.0, 20000.0], [1302724800000.0, 20000.0], [1302811200000.0, 20000.0], [1303156800000.0, 20000.0], [1303329600000.0, 20000.0], [1303934400000.0, 20000.0]], [[1302638400000.0, 20000.0], [1302724800000.0, 20610.650000000001], [1302811200000.0, 22266.650000000001], [1303156800000.0, 24916.93], [1303329600000.0, 26107.32], [1303934400000.0, 29114.669999999998], [1304452800000.0, 30078.23]], [[1302718580000.0, 0.0], [1302772440000.0, 3.0532500000000073], [1303107093000.0, 11.333250000000007], [1303107102000.0, 21.753250000000008], [1303352295000.0, 24.584650000000003], [1303352311000.0, 26.8766], [1303815010000.0, 30.536599999999996], [1303815028000.0, 27.703349999999993]]];";
Regex r = new Regex(@"\s\[\[(.*?)\]\]");

MatchCollection result = r.Matches(source);

if (result.Count > 0) {
    Console.WriteLine(result[result.Count - 1]);
} else {
    Console.WriteLine("No match found!");
}
Console.ReadLine();
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the coding is in c# –  Vazgun Dec 12 '12 at 23:20
    
The coding is in c# –  Vazgun Dec 12 '12 at 23:21
    
@user1333853, I added a C# solution –  stema Dec 13 '12 at 7:07

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