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The following test produces the same sequence of numbers in both cases:

#include <iostream>
#define BIT_SCAN_IFZERO 0

inline size_t bsr(size_t input) {
    size_t pos, ifzero = BIT_SCAN_IFZERO;
    __asm 
    { 
        bsr eax, input
        cmovz eax,ifzero
        mov pos,eax
    };
    return pos;
}

inline size_t bsf(size_t input) {
    size_t pos, ifzero = BIT_SCAN_IFZERO;
    __asm 
    { 
        bsf eax, input
        cmovz eax,ifzero
        mov pos,eax
    };
    return pos;
}

int main()
{ 
    size_t value = 1;

    for(int i=0;i<32;++i)
    {
        std::cout<<bsf(value)<<",";
        value<<=1;
    }
    std::cout<<std::endl;
    value = 1;
    for(int i=0;i<32;++i)
    {
        std::cout<<bsr(value)<<",";
        value<<=1;
    }
    return 0;
}

In both cases, 0 to 31 are printed in the same sequence.

Shouldn't bsf(x) produce 32-bsr(x)?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No. This is normal behavior if there is only one bit set in the source. If it would be like you think the result would not be very useful. Because it gives you the same zero based index it is clear which bit is meant for both commands.

http://courses.engr.illinois.edu/ece390/archive/spr2002/books/labmanual/inst-ref-bsf.html

The only difference is the search direction, but the command will transform the index for you.

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Oh, so I can pick the right one depending on the distribution of my input data, because one might be faster than the other? –  TravisG Dec 12 '12 at 10:23
    
BSF and BSR are introduced with the 80386. This was a typical CISC (Complex Instruction Set Chip) architecture and those commands fit in this context. To be honest I never used this instruction before but i guess they are slow. Of course it depends on the implementation of this command in the different x86 CPU cores (micro code, hard coded). You can do some tests to find it out. –  Fermat2357 Dec 12 '12 at 10:28
    
Thanks. Another question, though: Is there a fast way to find the first set bit starting from the MSB? –  TravisG Dec 12 '12 at 11:10
    
Yes the question is can you do it faster then BSF/BSR. Im not sure for that, but maybe a sequence of simple instructions is faster. But this is something you can find out by testing. –  Fermat2357 Dec 12 '12 at 16:08
    
There is no better way. When you want the first set bit (and not its index) from the LSB you can use a different trick (n & -n), which is faster on AMDs, Atom and P4. –  harold Dec 12 '12 at 19:34

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