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I need to modify a variable from an inner class. The compiler says I need to declare the variable static, but then I can't modify it. The code is something like this:

public class Outter{
   private boolean b;

   public Outter(){  
      b = false;
      new Inner(b);
   }
}

public class Inner{
   public Inner(boolean b){
      b = true;
   }
}

Is there anything like the "extern" in C? Or any solution so I could modify the b variable? I've tried setting it to static and passing the whole Outter class as a parameter, but I keep having the same problem.

EDIT: Well the code is more like:

public class MainView{
   private boolean view;
   //JMenus,JMenuItems, JPanels.. declarations
   private JFrame frame
   MainView(){
     view = true;
     //initializations
     create_listeners();
   }
   public void create_listeners(){
      Menu.addActionListener(
        new ActionListener() { 
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent event){
                if(View){
                    new View2(frame);
                    View = false;
                }
            }

        }  
   );
   }
}

public class View2{
   private JButton back = new JButton("Back");
   public View2(JFrame frame){
    //initialitzatons
    create_listeners();
}
   public void create_listeners(){
          back.addActionListener(
        new ActionListener() { 
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent event){
                frame.remove(MainPanel);
                View = true;// HERE, i want to modify the variable
                }

        }  
    );
    }
 }

The problem is how should I modify the variable "View" from the View2 class.

Sorry for bad tabulation, I did it quick and required code translation to be understood.

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Have a look at the reply to a similar question: stackoverflow.com/questions/6830637/… –  sglahn Dec 12 '12 at 9:38

5 Answers 5

Firstly, your Inner class is outside the Outer class, put it inside the outer class

public class Outter{
   private boolean b;

   public Outter(){  
      b = false;
      new Inner(b);
   }
   public class Inner{
       public Inner(boolean b){
          b = true;
       }
    }
   public static void main(String[] args) {
       System.out.println(new Outter().b);
   }
}

java passes variables(both primitives and reference) by value , not pass by reference, the variable b in inner class is a seperate new variable.in your code you are modifying the value of b declared in inner class not the outer class. if you want to modify the value of b of outer class, do something like this:

public class Outter{
   private boolean b;

   public Outter(){  
      b = false;
      new Inner();
   }
   public class Inner{
       public Inner(){
          b = true;
       }
    }
   public static void main(String[] args) {
       System.out.println(new Outter().b);
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
In fact my intention was that the Inner class was outside of the Outer, in a file apart, because I have a few similar Inner classes, and all of them stuck in the Outer would be such a huge class. –  user1897262 Dec 12 '12 at 9:49
    
In fact my intention was that the Inner class was outside of the Outer, it wouldn't be an inner class then, its a seperate outer class if you declare outside your outer class. –  PermGenError Dec 12 '12 at 9:50
    
Then, why the compiler is saying something like this: local variable b is accessed from within inner class; needs to be declared final ? –  user1897262 Dec 12 '12 at 9:52
    
@user1897262 i am afraid, not with the code you posted. please post the proper code, remember that inner class is something which is wrapped inside the outer class. –  PermGenError Dec 12 '12 at 9:55

The syntax is as follows, you obtain the reference to the outer class using Outter.this

public class Outter{
   private boolean b;

   class Inner{
       public Inner(boolean b){
          Outter.this.b = true;
       }
   }
}

Edit: It looks to me that you are trying to modify b just by passing a reference. In java this is not possible. Variables are passed as arguments by copy of reference variable (a reference variable is something like a pointer) or, in case of primitives, by copy.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there any other solution than passing it by reference? I mean the Inner class to be in a file a part from the Outer, and the Outer just call the Inner. In C/C++ that would be easy with the extern, but i don't know how to do it in java. –  user1897262 Dec 12 '12 at 9:50
    
Outter must have an object that has a boolean (e.g. a java bean with a setter). Then, it may pass a reference to this object to Inner and Inner may change the value of the boolean (use the setter to set the new value). I get this looks a bit overkill to someone from a C background, but, after some years of development, I personally have come to appreciate the more simple and clear programming style this promotes. –  dkateros Dec 12 '12 at 9:57
    
So, instead of a boolean, I should create another "mini-class" which contain a boolean, and set/get function and pass as the parameter this class? –  user1897262 Dec 12 '12 at 10:20
    
I tried this and I am still having the same compiling problem: "./VistaModUsuari.java:68: error: local variable v is accessed from within inner class; needs to be declared final" even when the new mini-class is declared final in the Main class. –  user1897262 Dec 12 '12 at 11:01
    
The reference variable of the mini-class instance should be declared final, before passing it to the inner class, not the mini-class itself –  dkateros Dec 12 '12 at 17:40

You are looking for something like:

public class Outer {
  // Using atomic because it is a convenient mutable boolean.
  private final AtomicBoolean b = new AtomicBoolean();

  public Outer() {
    b.set(true);
    new Inner();
  }

  public class Inner {
    public Inner() {
      b.set(false);
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Although it works, it seems a little overkilled (and unnecessary) here! –  assylias Dec 12 '12 at 10:06

Your code is also right Because Java doesn't pass variables by reference; it passes them by value.

share|improve this answer
    
Your statement can be easily mis-interpreted by many. –  Vikram Singh Dec 12 '12 at 9:53
    
@VikramSingh how so ???? –  PermGenError Dec 12 '12 at 10:02

After your edit it seems that perhaps what you are looking for is an interface. Could this pattern be what you meant to ask for?

public interface Viewable {
  public void setViewed ( boolean viewed );
  public boolean isViewed ();
}

class Outer implements Viewable {
  private boolean viewed = false;

  @Override
  public boolean isViewed() {
    return viewed;
  }

  @Override
  public void setViewed(boolean viewed) {
    this.viewed = viewed;
  }

}

class Inner {
  public Inner ( Viewable view ) {
    view.setViewed(true);
  }
}

Inner inner = new Inner(new Outer());

I have chosen Outer and Inner as class names to connect with your original question. You will find much better names.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help, I'll try to add this to my code as soon as I can. –  user1897262 Dec 12 '12 at 11:09

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