Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm using cygwin version of expand with bash shell.

When calling expand to replace all \t with (spaces) expand also changes all newline endings from \n to \r\n.

I'm using the following bash script:

#!/bin/bash

BRANCH=$1

TMPFILE=/tmp/temporaryExpander

EXTENSIONS=(
    cpp
    cxx
    h
    java
    txt
    cs
    csproj
    vcproj
    sln
    csdproj
)

function TabsToSpacesForFile
{
    relativeFilePath=$1
    absoluteFilePath=`pwd`/$relativeFilePath

    expand --tabs=4 $absoluteFilePath > $TMPFILE
    cat $TMPFILE > $absoluteFilePath
}

for project in `ls $BRANCH`
do
    for extension in "${EXTENSIONS[@]}"
    do
        find $BRANCH/$project -name "*\.${extension}" | while read file; do TabsToSpacesForFile "$file"; done
    done
done
share|improve this question
    
I know this doesn't solve you problem directly but you could use this command to replace tabs with spaces: cat file | tr "\t" " ". –  squiguy Dec 12 '12 at 9:52
1  
btw, to convert from relative path to absolute path, I would recommend using readlink -f... –  anishsane Dec 12 '12 at 12:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

instead of:

expand --tabs=4 $absoluteFilePath > $TMPFILE
cat $TMPFILE > $absoluteFilePath

why not try:

sed -i 's/\t/    /g' $absoluteFilePath

that shouldn't mess with the line endings at all.

share|improve this answer

Do dos2unix "$file" to convert the line endings back to unix style.

The Dos2unix package includes utilities "dos2unix" and "unix2dos" to convert plain text files in DOS or Mac format to Unix format and vice versa.

In DOS/Windows text files a line break, also known as newline, is a combination of two characters: a Carriage Return (CR) followed by a Line Feed (LF). In Unix text files a line break is a single character: the Line Feed (LF). In Mac text files, prior to Mac OS X, a line break was single Carriage Return (CR) character. Nowadays Mac OS uses Unix style (LF) line breaks.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd rather revert the line endings to what they were before my conversion. Unfortunately it's not like all files have unix line endings right now. –  jaccus Dec 12 '12 at 10:00
    
So you have some files with dos line ending and some with unix and you want them all to keep there original? –  iiSeymour Dec 12 '12 at 10:06

How about

function TabsToSpacesForFile
{
    relativeFilePath=$1
    absoluteFilePath=`pwd`/$relativeFilePath
    absoluteFilePathLineEndings=false
    expand --tabs=4 $absoluteFilePath > $TMPFILE
    file $absoluteFilePath | grep -q CRLF && dos2unix $TMPFILE
    cp $TMPFILE $absoluteFilePath
}

I am assuming all to be text files; no binary files.

Also, you should perhaps rm $TMPFILE at the end. Quote the variables for $absoluteFilePath etc if needed.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.