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I need a negative lookahead expression, but I can't make it work :( I hope someone can help me. I need an expression which is true until the sample does not contain 2 words anywhere in the sample. For example the 2 words pie donuts:

i sure like eating pie, but i love donuts very much
---> false
i sure like eating but i love donuts very much
---> true
i sure like eating pie, but i love hamburger very much
---> true
i sure like eating donuts, but i love pie very much
---> false
i sure like eating piedonuts very much
---> false

I have tried it in many forms, but it does not work.

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It would help and show your own effort if you provided some of the patterns that did not work. Also which language or tool are you using the pattern in? –  m.buettner Dec 12 '12 at 10:03
1  
I guess I sure like eating very much should return True? –  Tim Pietzcker Dec 12 '12 at 10:05
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could do this with two positive lookaheads that are nested inside a negative one (all starting from the beginning of your string):

^(?!(?=.*pie)(?=.*donuts))

So the inner lookaheads require to match both words. If they do the contents of the negative lookahead will match, so the lookahead itself will cause the pattern to fail.

If you can have line breaks in your input, make sure to use the s or dotall option (otherwise, . does not match line breaks).

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+1 Nice solution. –  dan1111 Dec 12 '12 at 10:29
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Much simpler than using negative lookahead is simply having two regexes and checking that they don't match.

You didn't specify the language, but here is a simple example in Perl:

use warnings;
use strict;

while (<DATA>)
{
    my $match = (/pie/ and /donuts/) ? 'false' : 'true';
    print $_;
    print "--> $match\n";
}

__DATA__
i sure like eating pie, but i love donuts very much
i sure like eating but i love donuts very much
i sure like eating pie, but i love hamburger very much
i sure like eating donuts, but i love pie very much
i sure like eating piedonuts very much
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Unfortunately I have to use standard regular expression because the application where I need it accept only regular expressions –  user1892024 Dec 12 '12 at 10:12
1  
@user1892024 that is why I asked you to specify your environment –  m.buettner Dec 12 '12 at 10:22
    
@user1892024, these are standard regular expressions. Do you have a specific tool that will only accept a single regex? If so, please update your question to show an example of using this tool, and also explain what language you are using. Features like lookahead vary by implementation. –  dan1111 Dec 12 '12 at 10:24
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try this out, it worked when i used perl compatible

.+(?=(.+(?<!.+?donuts.+?)\s\bpie\b(?!.+donuts.+))|(.+(?<!.+pie.+)\sdonuts(?!.+pie.+))).*$     
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What do you mean by perl compatible? With those variable-length lookbehinds in it, your regex will only work in two regex flavors that I know of, and Perl isn't one of them. It's also extremely inefficient, and not just because of the lookbehinds. –  Alan Moore Dec 13 '12 at 9:12
    
yeah it is true, i thought it would work with perl, i really just tried it with jgsoft, i hope somebody will give a better answer i am interested in to know. –  alex Dec 13 '12 at 14:26
    
Yep, that's one of the two; .NET is the other. If you're using RegexBuddy, you can specify the target flavor. When I chose Perl (for example), it generated an error message and didn't match any of the sample strings. As for the better answer, I'd say m.buettner's solution definitive. –  Alan Moore Dec 13 '12 at 16:43
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