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If I have the value "foo", and a HashMap<String> ftw for which ftw.containsValue("foo") returns true, how can I get the corresponding key? Do I have to loop through the hashmap? What is the best way to do that?

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27  
Note that there is no single corresponding key - there may well be multiple keys mapping to the same value. –  CPerkins Sep 6 '09 at 0:07
    
If you want to know this and much more of HashMap please cover my Internal Life of HashMap tutorial –  Volodymyr Levytskyi Jul 25 '13 at 10:48
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18 Answers

up vote 87 down vote accepted

If you choose to use the Commons Collections library instead of the standard Java Collections API, you can achieve this with ease.

The BidiMap interface in the Collections library is a bi-directional map, allowing you to map a key to a value (like normal maps), and also to map a value to a key, thus allowing you to perform lookups in both directions. Obtaining a key for a value is supported by the getKey() method.

There is a caveat though, bidi maps cannot have multiple values mapped to keys, and hence unless your data set has 1:1 mappings between keys and values, you cannot use bidimaps.

Update

If you want to rely on the Java Collections API, you will have to ensure the 1:1 relationship between keys and values at the time of inserting the value into the map. This is easier said than done.

Once you can ensure that, use the entrySet() method to obtain the set of entries (mappings) in the Map. Once you have obtained the set whose type is Map.Entry, iterate through the entries, comparing the stored value against the expected, and obtain the corresponding key.

Update #2

Support for bidi maps with generics can be found in Google Collections and the refactored Commons-Collections libraries (the latter is not an Apache project). Thanks to Esko for pointing out the missing generic support in Apache Commons Collections. Using collections with generics makes more maintainable code.

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14  
...and if you like Generics and all that modern stuff, Google Collections has BiMap where you can get key matching specified value by calling biMap.inverse().get(value); –  Esko Sep 5 '09 at 20:15
1  
Yes, Apache Commons Collections doesn't support generics. However, there is Google Collections as you've pointed out (which I don't use yet - no 1.0 release yet), and there is the refactored Commons-Collections with support for Generics. You'll find this as a Sourceforge project @ sourceforge.net/projects/collections –  Vineet Reynolds Sep 5 '09 at 20:29
2  
The Google Collections are not a refactored version of Commons-Collections. –  whiskeysierra Aug 9 '10 at 16:42
9  
@whiskeysierra: I don't think anyone is (currently) saying so. –  huff Sep 29 '11 at 3:00
    
It looks like Apache Commons will get a BidiMap with generics support in release 4.0 (currently in alpha release): commons.apache.org/proper/commons-collections/javadocs/… –  Ogre Psalm33 Oct 21 '13 at 13:05
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If your data structure has many-to-one mapping between keys and values you should iterate over entries and pick all suitable keys:

public static <T, E> Set<T> getKeysByValue(Map<T, E> map, E value) {
    Set<T> keys = new HashSet<T>();
    for (Entry<T, E> entry : map.entrySet()) {
        if (value.equals(entry.getValue())) {
            keys.add(entry.getKey());
        }
    }
    return keys;
}

In case of one-to-one relationship, you can return the first matched key:

public static <T, E> T getKeyByValue(Map<T, E> map, E value) {
    for (Entry<T, E> entry : map.entrySet()) {
        if (value.equals(entry.getValue())) {
            return entry.getKey();
        }
    }
    return null;
}

In Java 8:

public static <T, E> Set<T> getKeysByValue(Map<T, E> map, E value) {
    return map.entrySet()
              .stream()
              .filter(entry -> entry.getValue().equals(value))
              .map(entry -> entry.getKey())
              .collect(Collectors.toSet());
}

Also, for Guava users, BiMap may be useful. For example:

BiMap<Token, Character> tokenToChar = 
    ImmutableBiMap.of(Token.LEFT_BRACKET, '[', Token.LEFT_PARENTHESIS, '(');
Token token = tokenToChar.inverse().get('(');
Character c = tokenToChar.get(token);
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60  
+1 for being the only one that showed how you can do this using the Java API. –  Shervin May 25 '10 at 11:57
7  
+1, was going to write this myself, but you propose a very elegant solution –  Peter Perháč May 31 '10 at 11:19
14  
+1 I would choose this one as accepted. –  karim Jan 28 '11 at 21:36
5  
+1 for using only the Java API. –  GGB667 Feb 21 '13 at 21:22
2  
+1 because I love static templated functions that are useful –  rupps May 8 '13 at 2:45
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public class NewClass1 {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
       Map<Integer, String> testMap = new HashMap<Integer, String>();
        testMap.put(10, "a");
        testMap.put(20, "b");
        testMap.put(30, "c");
        testMap.put(40, "d");
        for (Entry<Integer, String> entry : testMap.entrySet()) {
            if (entry.getValue().equals("c")) {
                System.out.println(entry.getKey());
            }
        }
    }
}
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2  
Careful of your code indenting dude. You can take a look at how I edited you answer. Good luck! –  Gray Oct 12 '11 at 14:28
    
thanks....you save my aloat time.... –  Manan Shah Oct 9 '12 at 7:26
    
@user1640065 You're welcome –  Fathah Rehman P Oct 9 '12 at 8:54
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I think your choices are

  • Use a map implementation built for this, like the BiMap from google collections. Note that the google collections BiMap requires uniqueless of values, as well as keys, but it provides high performance in both directions performance
  • Manually maintain two maps - one for key -> value, and another map for value -> key
  • Iterate through the entrySet() and to find the keys which match the value. This is the slowest method, since it requires iterating through the entire collection, while the other two methods don't require that.
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To find all the keys that map to that value, iterate through all the pairs in the hashmap, using map.entrySet().

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There is no unambiguous answer, because multiple keys can map to the same value. If you are enforcing unique-ness with your own code, the best solution is to create a class that uses two Hashmaps to track the mappings in both directions.

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If you build the map in your own code, try putting the key and value in the map together:

public class KeyValue {
    public Object key;
    public Object value;
    public KeyValue(Object key, Object value) { ... }
}

map.put(key, new KeyValue(key, value));

Then when you have a value, you also have the key.

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2  
Clever, but what if there are 2 or more KeyValue objects containing the same value? Which key should one choose? –  Vineet Reynolds Sep 5 '09 at 18:15
1  
@Vineet, I don't see how this approach solves the OP's question. what did you mean by "Then when you have a value, you also have the key."? –  Qiang Li Sep 4 '11 at 16:53
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It sounds like the best way is for you to iterate over entries using map.entrySet() since map.containsValue() probably does this anyway.

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Yes, that's exactly what it does. But of course it returns true as soon as it finds one value for which .equals is true, as opposed to what OP will probably need to do. –  CPerkins Sep 6 '09 at 0:08
1  
Well, iterating over entries can return with key as soon as it finds a matching value too. Multiple matches did not seem to be a concern. –  Jonas Klemming Sep 6 '09 at 22:11
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I'm afraid you'll just have to iterate your map. Shortest I could come up with:

Iterator<Map.Entry<String,String>> iter = map.entrySet().iterator();
while (iter.hasNext()) {
    Map.Entry<String,String> entry = iter.next();
    if (entry.getValue().equals(value_you_look_for)) {
        String key_you_look_for = entry.getKey();
    }
}
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You can get the key using values using following code..

ArrayList valuesList = new ArrayList();
Set keySet = initalMap.keySet();
ArrayList keyList = new ArrayList(keySet);

for(int i = 0 ; i < keyList.size() ; i++ ) {
    valuesList.add(initalMap.get(keyList.get(i)));
}

Collections.sort(valuesList);
Map finalMap = new TreeMap();
for(int i = 0 ; i < valuesList.size() ; i++ ) {
    String value = (String) valuesList.get(i);

    for( int j = 0 ; j < keyList.size() ; j++ ) {
        if(initalMap.get(keyList.get(j)).equals(value)) {
            finalMap.put(keyList.get(j),value);
        }   
    }
}
System.out.println("fianl map ---------------------->  " + finalMap);
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public static class SmartHashMap <T1 extends Object, T2 extends Object> {
    public HashMap<T1, T2> keyValue;
    public HashMap<T2, T1> valueKey;

    public SmartHashMap(){
        this.keyValue = new HashMap<T1, T2>();
        this.valueKey = new HashMap<T2, T1>();
    }

    public void add(T1 key, T2 value){
        this.keyValue.put(key, value);
        this.valueKey.put(value, key);
    }

    public T2 getValue(T1 key){
        return this.keyValue.get(key);
    }

    public T1 getKey(T2 value){
        return this.valueKey.get(value);
    }

}
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I think this answer could be improved by adding an explanation. –  Jonathan Dec 12 '12 at 20:47
1  
-1. I tested it with String as key and value. When I call map.add("1", "2"); map.add("1","3"); then I can call map.getKey("2"); and retrieve "1", even though "1" is the key for "3". –  jlordo Jan 30 '13 at 10:01
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If you're sure that the map contains 1 to 1 pairs, and you don't want to use any libraries, you could insert both the key,value pair and its inverse into your map structure

map.put("theKey", "theValue");
map.put("theValue", "theKey");

Using map.get("theValue") will then return "theKey"

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Yes, you have to loop through the hashmap, unless you implement something along the lines of what these various answers suggest. Rather than fiddling with the entrySet, I'd just get the keySet(), iterate over that set, and keep the (first) key that gets you your matching value. If you need all the keys that match that value, obviously you have to do the whole thing.

As Jonas suggests, this might already be what the containsValue method is doing, so you might just skip that test all-together, and just do the iteration every time (or maybe the compiler will already eliminate the redundancy, who knows).

Also, relative to the other answers, if your reverse map looks like

Map<Value, Set<Key>>

you can deal with non-unique key->value mappings, if you need that capability (untangling them aside). That would incorporate fine into any of the solutions people suggest here using two maps.

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Use a thin wrapper: https://github.com/jayenashar/Java-Search-library/blob/master/src/au/edu/unsw/cse/jayen/util/HMap.java

import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

public class HMap<K, V> {

   private final Map<K, Map<K, V>> map;

   public HMap() {
      map = new HashMap<K, Map<K, V>>();
   }

   public HMap(final int initialCapacity) {
      map = new HashMap<K, Map<K, V>>(initialCapacity);
   }

   public boolean containsKey(final Object key) {
      return map.containsKey(key);
   }

   public V get(final Object key) {
      final Map<K, V> entry = map.get(key);
      if (entry != null)
         return entry.values().iterator().next();
      return null;
   }

   public K getKey(final Object key) {
      final Map<K, V> entry = map.get(key);
      if (entry != null)
         return entry.keySet().iterator().next();
      return null;
   }

   public V put(final K key, final V value) {
      final Map<K, V> entry = map
            .put(key, Collections.singletonMap(key, value));
      if (entry != null)
         return entry.values().iterator().next();
      return null;
   }
}
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downvote with no comment? –  Jayen Jun 11 at 0:09
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import java.util.ArrayList;

import java.util.HashMap;

import java.util.Iterator;

import java.util.List;

import java.util.Set;

public class M{

public static void main(String[] args) {

        HashMap<String, List<String>> resultHashMap = new HashMap<String, List<String>>();

        Set<String> newKeyList = resultHashMap.keySet();


        for (Iterator<String> iterator = originalHashMap.keySet().iterator(); iterator.hasNext();) {
            String hashKey = (String) iterator.next();

            if (!newKeyList.contains(originalHashMap.get(hashKey))) {
                List<String> loArrayList = new ArrayList<String>();
                loArrayList.add(hashKey);
                resultHashMap.put(originalHashMap.get(hashKey), loArrayList);
            } else {
                List<String> loArrayList = resultHashMap.get(originalHashMap
                        .get(hashKey));
                loArrayList.add(hashKey);
                resultHashMap.put(originalHashMap.get(hashKey), loArrayList);
            }
        }

        System.out.println("Original HashMap : " + originalHashMap);
        System.out.println("Result HashMap : " + resultHashMap);

    }

}
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Iterator<Map.Entry<String,String>> iterator = map.entrySet().iterator();
while (iterator.hasNext()) {
    Map.Entry<String,String> entry = iterator.next();
    if (entry.getValue().equals(value_you_look_for)) {
        String key_you_look_for = entry.getKey();
}
} 
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/*
 * This class will hold unique values.
 */
class UniqueValueMap {
    private Map map = new HashMap();

    public boolean put(Object objA, Object objB) {

        if(objA == null || objB == null) {
            return false;
        }
        if (map.get(objA) != null ) {
            remove(objA);
        }
        if (map.get(objB) != null){
            remove(objB);
        }

        map.put(objA, objB);
        map.put(objB, objA);
        return true;
    }

    public Object getValue(Object key) {
        return map.get(key);
    }

    public void remove(Object key) {
        Object other = map.get(key);
        if (other != null ) {
            map.remove(other);
            map.remove(key);
        }
    }
}
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only works if type of key and value are the same. –  Atmocreations May 2 at 12:33
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In java8

map.entrySet().stream().filter(entry -> entry.getValue().equals(value))
    .forEach(entry -> System.out.println(entry.getKey()));
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