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I have next code:

InputStream is = new FileInputStream("test.txt");
// do something
try {
    is.close();
} catch(IOException ex) {
    // do nothing
    // or
    // NOP
    // or something else?
}

The question is is there any convention in Java world for comment that tells do nothing? Like in my case I want to do nothing if it is not possible to close InputStream. Is the "NOP" comment acceptable? It is from Assembler and it means "no operation".

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I find both variants equally readable, but in this instance I personally would write // ignore the exception. –  NPE Dec 12 '12 at 11:20
    
} catch(IOException ignoreAndContinue) { –  Andrew Thompson Dec 12 '12 at 11:22
    
errr.......why do you want to ignore exception? –  Sayem Ahmed Dec 12 '12 at 11:25
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted
try {
    ...
} catch (IOException ignored) {}

is complete, clear and succinct.


But you should be using something like Apache Commons IO IOUtils.closeQuietly(InputStream).

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It doesn't really matter, there's no defined convention though I see NOP more often than others. For me the important thing is marking why you are ignoring the exception. I personally prefer a "//NOP - Explanation" style e.g.

//NOP - If we can't read this input file it doesn't matter as next block will try another
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There is no standard way of doing it, there isn't even a standard that says you have to put a comment there. If at all there would be a guideline, it would be in your company's coding standards. If not, use whatever you like.

Only 1 thing i can say about it. Make sure it's clear what you mean.

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There is no convention that I know of. I usually put // pass, for the python statement.

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