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Veterans please forgive me for asking silly question. I understand that a class having private constructor prevents instance creation .

class InterestRate
{
    // static constructor
    static InterestRate()
    {
    }

    //private constructor
    private InterestRate()
    {
    }

    // private overloaded constructor
    private InterestRate(double d1,double d2)
    {
    }

    // overloaded constructor    
    public InterestRate(int a,int b)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("a={0},b={0}",a,b);
    }
}

static void Main()
{
    //As it is private constructor invokation i can not create a instance
    InterestRate firstInstance=new InterestRate();

    // non-private overloaded constructor allow me to craete instance 
    InterestRate r=new InterestRate(10,10);
}

My question is if a class with a private constructor prevents instance creation, why does that class support having a non-private constructor?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Private constructors don't only prevent instantiation from the outside world - they often enable construction from within the class. Indeed, the only reason a private constructor is often used to prevent instantiation is to avoid the compiler adding a public parameterless constructor by default. That's the only way in which a private constructor hinders other callers.

For example, suppose you have a class which needs to accept a collection in its constructor. A public constructor may always act defensively, copying the collection. However, you may have certain cases where the code within the class wants to create a new instance and knows that it doesn't need to copy the collection, just the reference. That's just one situation in which a private constructor makes a lot of sense.

It does depend on the exact situation though.

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Jon can you give very basic example? –  user160677 Sep 5 '09 at 17:56
    
Of what, exactly? The collections bit? I'm not sure I've got a real world example to hand, although I could probably have used this technique in MiniBench (code.google.com/p/minibench) –  Jon Skeet Sep 5 '09 at 18:05
    
No No.I got it.I got it.Just I am reading your book CSharp in depth.I am getting enough exposure on collections from your book.When then and there doubt arise,i am making some silly questions.The problem is in my understanding ,I hope soon i will i have good understanding of C# and Object modeling. :) –  user160677 Sep 5 '09 at 18:14

Adding a private constructor to a class doesn't mean that you won't be able to create instances of that class. Instead, it only means that you could access the constructor within the context of the class itself (for example, by using a static factory method).

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or to answer the OP's question, the non-private constructor is able to access the private constructor, because it is within the class. –  Paul McGuire Sep 5 '09 at 18:07

In the context of this question, constructors act like any other method - private ones are inaccessible from outside the class, while public ones are accessible. As Jon mentioned, usually adding a private constructor with no parameters simply prevents the compiler from adding a default public constructor with no parameters. If there already exists another constructor in the class (private parameterless or otherwise), the compiler will not add this default constructor.

So, a private constructor doesn't prevent instance creation - it simply limits instance creation to being done only within a method of the class (perhaps a public static method). And that only pertains to the usage of that particular private constructor. Any other constructor allows instance creation according to its own modifier.

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Also, if you have a private constructor that takes arguments, and a public constructor that takes no arguments you can still call the private constructor from the public one.

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