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I am getting some unusual behaviour in my openCL program.

In a host part of the program I create an array of double and set all elements to zero. That array is copied to the GPU using:

memObjects[4] = clCreateBuffer(context, CL_MEM_READ_WRITE | CL_MEM_COPY_HOST_PTR,
                             sizeof(double) * I_numel, I, NULL);

Inside the kernel some elements are set to 1 depending on some condition and then I read it back to the host with:

errNum = clEnqueueReadBuffer(commandQueue, memObjects[4], CL_TRUE, 0,
                           I_numel * sizeof(double), I, 0, NULL, NULL);

However, some of the elements that were supposed to be zero have changed to very small ( 6.953267903e-310 ) or very large numbers ( 2.0002319483e+161 ) !?!

I've tried changing double to float but the results are similar. I am using nvidia implementation of openCL, version is 1.1. Does anyone know what is the problem?

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2 Answers 2

I suspect there's something wrong with your kernel code. What happens if you do just the clEnqueueRead without running the kernel at all, do you then get all zeros? How about if you drop the CL_MEM_COPY_HOST_PTR and clear the buffer with clEnqueueWrite instead?

I tried to reproduce the issue with this simplified kernel, but the output was just alternating zeros and ones, as expected:

kernel void enqueueReadBuffer(global float* outputValueArray) {
  int gid = get_global_id(0);
  if (gid % 2 == 0) {
    outputValueArray[gid] = 1.0f;
  }
}

I ran this on three different OpenCL drivers on Windows 7, including NVIDIA Quadro FX4800 (R307.45), and got the correct result on all of them.

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The kernel is definitely not the problem! There is some problem with memory copying! Take a look at this simple example: –  user1894442 Dec 12 '12 at 14:49
    
double a[10]; for(int i=0; i<10; ++i) a[i++] = i + 0.5; cl_mem memObj = NULL; memObj = clCreateBuffer(context, CL_MEM_READ_WRITE, sizeof(double) * 10, NULL, NULL); errNum = clEnqueueWriteBuffer(commandQueue, memObj, CL_TRUE, 0, 10 * sizeof(double), a, 0, NULL, NULL); errNum = clEnqueueReadBuffer(commandQueue, memObj, CL_TRUE, 0, 10 * sizeof(double), a, 0, NULL, NULL); std::cout.precision(10); for(int i=0; i<10; ++i) std::cout << a[i++] << " "; std::cout << std::endl; –  user1894442 Dec 12 '12 at 14:51
    
The output I get is: 0.5 2.5 4.5 6.5 8.5 –  user1894442 Dec 12 '12 at 14:52
    
output I get is: 0.5 6.906593604e-310 2.5 0 4.5 2.080526245e-317 6.5 6.906593843e-310 8.5 2.964393875e-323 2.964393875e-323 –  user1894442 Dec 12 '12 at 14:58
1  
@user1894442 your "simple example" has a bug - you increment i twice in each loop, so only the even entries have a value, while the uneven ones contain garbage. –  Oak Dec 13 '12 at 8:41

Try replacing the shown code with this and then post the err numbers

cl_int err;
memObjects[4] = clCreateBuffer(context, CL_MEM_READ_WRITE | CL_MEM_COPY_HOST_PTR,
                             sizeof(double) * I_numel, I, &err);

printf("Buffer creation error no = %d", err);

And for the copy back

cl_int err2;
err2= clEnqueueReadBuffer(commandQueue, memObjects[4], CL_TRUE, 0,
                           I_numel * sizeof(double), I, 0, NULL, NULL);
printf("Copy back error no = %d", err2);
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