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I have two examples:

1.

$ echo "Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet" | awk '{gsub(/L[^r]r/,""); print}'

em ipsum dolor sit amet

2.

$ echo "Loorem ipsum dolor sit amet" | awk '{gsub(/L[^r]r/,""); print}'

Loorem ipsum dolor sit amet

Why the second example does not work the same as the first?

In the first example, the record of [^r] is treated as a single character? Is it because one "o" is deleted?

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@Matt Ball, Thank you. –  Tedee12345 Dec 12 '12 at 14:29
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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

L[^r]r matches L followed by any single character that isn't r followed by r like Lor. To match Loor you would want L[^r]+r. The + quantifier means one or more characters that are not r.

$ echo "Loorem ipsum dolor sit amet" | awk '{gsub(/L[^r]+r/,""); print}'
em ipsum dolor sit amet
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+1 to you, RE for L followed by any char then r ? –  Grijesh Chauhan Dec 12 '12 at 13:16
    
ok /L[^r]+r/," is my answer ? –  Grijesh Chauhan Dec 12 '12 at 13:16
1  
@sudo_O but he DID ask a question and claims he now has the answer to it. –  Ed Morton Dec 12 '12 at 13:52
1  
@GrijeshChauhan That is true, it doesn't seem related to your question though. The answer to your question as I understand it would be L.r. –  Ed Morton Dec 12 '12 at 13:55
1  
@sudo_O, Thank you for the explanation. –  Tedee12345 Dec 12 '12 at 14:15
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