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JavaScript: var functionName = function() {} vs function functionName() {}
What’s the difference in those declarations (in JavaScript)?

Is there any differences between the following function declarations:

function wtf() {

}

lol = function() {

}

omg: function() {

}

?

Regards

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marked as duplicate by deceze, Lews Therin, m4tx, Peter O., DocMax Dec 12 '12 at 18:02

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Oh, right. Sorry! :) –  m4tx Dec 12 '12 at 14:11
    
Please refer to this thread : stackoverflow.com/questions/1866084/… –  AmrFaissal Dec 12 '12 at 14:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

1- Is a regular function declaration.

2- You declare an anonymous function and you store it in a variable.

3- The last one is part of an object notation :

var obj = {
  omg:function(value){
    // some code here
  }
};
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1st one :

creates a function at page level ( global level u can say )

2nd : Assings the function to variable 'lol'

3rd: Syntax error. :P

Exactly similar to: What's the difference in those declarations (in JavaScript)?

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1  
The first one isn't necessarily global, it depends which scope it's defined in. Actually, in the example given, the second one is global, assuming the variable isn't scoped before. –  deceze Dec 12 '12 at 14:12
    
@deceze: If first 2 declared inside a function: are not they exact equivalent? –  closure Dec 12 '12 at 14:18
    
@raghavv this link explains it a bit more clearly. –  LPD Dec 12 '12 at 14:27
1  
@raghavv Nope, try it: jsfiddle.net/UtTGG –  deceze Dec 12 '12 at 14:29
1  
@raghavv, javascriptweblog.wordpress.com/2010/07/06/… –  LPD Dec 13 '12 at 4:21

No, it’s the quite the same thing for each of them.

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