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I have the following interfaces

public interface Group {
    public Group add(Group g);
    public Group sub(Group g);
    public Group getAddInv();
    public boolean isZero();
}

public interface Ring extends Group {
    public Ring mul(Ring r);
    public boolean isOne();
}

I now want to make these interfaces generic to make sure the methods can only be called for elements of the same algebraic structure.

For example it should be possible to add two elements of Ring but not to add one Element of Group and one element of Ring.

My first thought was using < ? super Ring > for the methods of Group, but that didn't work out. How can i achieve this?

Update:

public interface Group<T> {
    public T add(T g);
    public T sub(T g);
    public T getAddInv();
    public boolean isZero();
}

public interface Ring<T> extends Group<Ring<T>> {
    public T mul(T r);
    public boolean isOne();
}

Would that be a solution?

share|improve this question
    
By the way, are you defining interfaces for the whole sets, or just for their elements? I don't think you want to make a [direct] sum of tho whole groups, but better the result of the binary operation, as a single element of the set - am I right? –  moonwave99 Dec 12 '12 at 14:28
    
The interfaces define single elements. It is a excersice i have to solve for programming class - and its instructions are terrible... –  Lorunification Dec 12 '12 at 14:31
1  
My maths are quite rusty, but I think a Ring is not a Group. R, for instance, is not a group because of 0, and R* is not a Ring because of... 0. This kind of violates the OO principle : a subclass object must be a superclass object –  Jerome Dec 12 '12 at 14:33
    
In fact what he's asking for is a violation of the Liskov substitution principle. Ring should probably not extend Group. –  bowmore Dec 12 '12 at 14:35
1  
@Jerome yeah, a ring is a (R,+,*) structure where (R,+) is an abelian group and (R,*) just a semigroup, so plain interface inheritance kinda sucks at dealing with them. –  moonwave99 Dec 12 '12 at 14:44

3 Answers 3

It should be like this:

public interface Group<T> {
    public T add(T g);
    public T sub(T g);
    public T getAddInv();
    public boolean isZero();
}

public interface Ring<T> extends Group<T> {
    public T mul(T r);
    public boolean isOne();
}

Actual implementations would implement these interfaces with a type parameter of themselves:

class MyInteger implements Ring<MyInteger>
share|improve this answer

Maybe do you want to use such an interface:

public interface Test<T> {
    public void add(T t);
}

And then if you want you can use instanceof in you functions ?

share|improve this answer

I would not try to do this via the type system. First, as some comments already mentioned, the interface seems rather odd (what does adding one group to another mean?). Instead I'd focus on what is usually done on a group, which would like this

interface Group<T>{
  T add(T e1, T e2);  //adds two elements of the group and returns the result
  //sub is not a group operation, there is normally only one op
  ...
}

The same for the Ring, but add the mul() operation.

If you want to enforce that only elements that are contained within the group/ring can be used in operations, you implementation should check if the args are in the group/ring and throw an exception if not. The the type system is not designed to do this, as this is a value based check, not a type check.

share|improve this answer
    
Obviously you have to add T getAddInv(T) for additive inverse and T zero() for the null element. I think your idea is totally sound. –  Saintali Dec 12 '12 at 21:26
1  
Of course. My point was that the operation needs to operate on elements of the group, not on different groups. If the poor guy got those interfaces from the instructor, he's screwed anyway. –  Jochen Dec 12 '12 at 21:28

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