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For example I have A.java. in A.java I have:

public class A {
  // normal 
}

class B {  // cannot declare: public class B

}

And in same package with A.java. I create C.java and declare:

public class C {
  public void methodC() {  
      A a = new A(); 
      B b = new B(); // no error -> B is a public class
  }
}

If I create new class B in file C.java. C will refer class B in file C.java, not A.java.

class B {
}
public class C {
  public void methodC() {
      B b = new B(); //this B refer to C.java rather than A.java
  }
}

So, I have seen some problem here: in same package, there will be two same class. So, when I create D.java, how can I know which class B will be refered to ?

And another question, what real type of class B, when I declare it outside of class A and class C. This point makes me feel frustrated so much.

Thanks :)

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2  
well, firstly you cannot have two public class's in a single java file. your c.java would never compile as you declared both class c and class b as public –  PermGenError Dec 12 '12 at 14:47
    
@GanGnaMStYleOverFlowErroR ah, i'm sorry. I typed again by hand, so i miss this point here. I have edited my question :) –  hqt Dec 12 '12 at 14:48
    
@GanGnaMStYleOverFlowErroR but, as my question, if it not public, how can it call by another class in another file :( I cannot explain this point –  hqt Dec 12 '12 at 14:49
    
it doesnt matter if your class B isnt public, all your class's inside the same package (not file) can access B. do a test yourself. however you'd most definitely will get a compile time error as you have two class's with the same name in the same package –  PermGenError Dec 12 '12 at 14:50
    
You have to use the top class to refer to the sub class. B obj = new A.B ();, or B obj = new C.B ();. B has to be visible to the calling class though (it has to have a package or protected visibility). –  Laf Dec 12 '12 at 14:57

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When You had already done this in A.java:

public class A {
  // normal 
}

class B {  // cannot declare: public class B

}

You won't be able to define class B in same C.java in same package as it already exists in same package

class B {            //You won't be able to do this as same class in package exists

}
public class C {
  public void methodC() {
      B b = new B(); //this B refer to C.java rather than A.java
  }
}

What I have tried is below and it showed me this:

enter image description here

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I'm using Eclipse, and I don't meet error :( I don't know it just build C.java, or entire project –  hqt Dec 12 '12 at 15:09
    
I'm using Eclipse to and its showing me this error. As you said "I have seen some problem here: in same package, there will be two same class.", I don't think so this is right. –  Parth Dec 12 '12 at 15:15
    
Try to create the same thing again, I think Eclipse won't allow You to create two same named class in same package. –  Parth Dec 12 '12 at 15:18
    
ah. after I close Eclipse and open again, it has noticed error as you see. maybe some problem :( –  hqt Dec 12 '12 at 15:23
    
hahah... some times eclipse sleeps for a time :)) –  Parth Dec 12 '12 at 15:25

The class B which is defined in class A is not public, it is package private - visible only inside the package where it's defined.

When you'll also define the class B inside class D, you'll get an error: The type B is already defined.

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You'll get duplicate class definitions. A.java will be compiled to A.class and B.class. Compiling C.java will either result in an error or overwrite B.class.

The B class is not public, it's package local, so it can be used only by classes in the same package.

Why don't you create separate classes BForA and BForC or something? If you want to reuse something, create a shared AbstractB parent class.

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I guess you made a typo in the last code snippet (declaring B as public). But the important thing is that you cannot define two classes with the same name in a package. It would throw a compiler error. I have tried this with an IDE and the project indicates that there is an ambiguity as class B has already been defined.

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