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I have a HTML report, which needs to be printed landscape because of the many columns. It there a way to do this, without the user having to change the document settings?

And what are the options amongst browsers.

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10 Answers 10

up vote 145 down vote accepted

In your CSS you can set the @page property as shown below.

@media print{@page {size: landscape}}

The @page is part of CSS 2.1 specification however this size is not as highlighted by the answer to the question Is @Page { size:landscape} obsolete?:

CSS 2.1 no longer specifies the size attribute. The current working draft for CSS3 Paged Media module does specify it (but this is not standard or accepted).

As stated the size option comes from the CSS 3 Draft Specification. In theory it can be set to both a page size and orientation although in my sample the size is omitted.

The support is very mixed with a bug report begin filed in firefox, most browsers do not support it.

It may seem to work in IE7 but this is because IE7 will remember the users last selection of landscape or portrait in print preview (only the browser is re-started).

This article does have some suggested work arounds using JavaScript or ActiveX that send keys to the users browser although it they are not ideal and rely on changing the browsers security settings.

Alternately you could rotate the content rather than the page orientation. This can be done by creating a style and applying it to the body that includes these two lines but this also has draw backs creating many alignment and layout issues.

<style type="text/css" media="print">
    .page
    {
     -webkit-transform: rotate(-90deg); -moz-transform:rotate(-90deg);
     filter:progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.BasicImage(rotation=3);
    }
</style>

The final alternative I have found is to create a landscape version in a PDF. You can point to so when the user selects print it prints the PDF. However I could not get this to auto print work in IE7.

<link media="print" rel="Alternate" href="print.pdf">

In conclusion in some browsers it is relativity easy using the @page size option however in many browsers there is no sure way and it would depend on your content and environment. This maybe why Google Documents creates a PDF when print is selected and then allows the user to open and print that.

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8  
odd that it says 'size' can be landscape, when that's actually an 'orientation'. –  Magnus Smith Nov 10 '09 at 16:20
1  
@page size Does not seem to work on all modern browsers, only Firefox. Chrome and Opera both disregard this as far as I have seen. –  Justin808 May 17 '11 at 22:43
    
I have updated the answer after doing some more research, thanks –  John May 18 '11 at 7:42
2  
size: landscape is NOT part of CSS2.1, although @page rules are. It is, however, part of CSS3. For confirmation, try using the W3C CSS Validator and enter @page {size: landscape} and compare results with "Profile" set to level 2.1 vs level 3. –  daiscog Nov 2 '11 at 10:56
8  
@Justin808 This does work in Chrome now. –  kzh Feb 19 '13 at 19:07

You might be able to use the CSS 2 @page rule which allows you to set the 'size' property to landscape.

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Quoted from CSS-Discuss Wiki

The @page rule has been cut down in scope from CSS2 to CSS2.1. The full CSS2 @page rule was reportedly implemented only in Opera (and buggily even then). My own testing shows that IE and Firefox don't support @page at all. According to the now-obsolescent CSS2 spec section 13.2.2 it is possible to override the user's setting of orientation and (for example) force printing in Landscape but the relevant "size" property has been dropped from CSS2.1, consistent with the fact that no current browser supports it. It has been reinstated in the CSS3 Paged Media module but note that this is only a Working Draft (as at July 2009).

Conclusion: forget about @page for the present. If you feel your document needs to be printed in Landscape orientation, ask yourself if you can instead make your design more fluid. If you really can't (perhaps because the document contains data tables with many columns, for example), you will need to advise the user to set the orientation to Landscape and perhaps outline how to do it in the most common browsers. Of course, some browsers have a print fit-to-width (shrink-to-fit) feature (e.g. Opera, Firefox, IE7) but it's inadvisable to rely on users having this facility or having it switched on.

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3  
That's the "CSS-Discuss Wiki", not "Wikipedia". –  jball Dec 27 '10 at 16:54
    
Oops! saw the wiki page and didn't give attention lol! –  Ahmad Alfy Dec 27 '10 at 18:32

You can also use the non-standard IE-only css attribute writing-mode

div.page    { 
   writing-mode: tb-rl;
}
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1  
This does reorient the page content but doesn't really change the page layout to landscape. I.e. the headers and footers will still be added as if the page was portrait. –  Daniel Ballinger Jul 28 '09 at 3:13

Try to add this your CSS:

@page {
  size: landscape;
}
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Did this work for you with any of the browsers? With IE8 and Firefox3.5 it didn't seem to make any difference to the print preview. –  Daniel Ballinger Jul 28 '09 at 3:15
    
The print preview does not follow all the CSS properties, unfortunately. But this should works in all the current browsers. –  gizmo Jul 28 '09 at 5:30
    
Thanks for following up on this. It doesn't seem to work for me with actual printing either. Have I missed something? My test file is as follows: (I've had to truncate the paragraph content to fit in the comment box) <html> <head> <title>Landscape testing Page</title> <style> @Page { size: landscape; } </style> </head> <body> <p> Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, ... </p> </body> </html> –  Daniel Ballinger Jul 28 '09 at 23:06
    
I've tried every combination of the @Page rule shown on this page and some from other sites, as well as the example in O'Reilly's HTML/XHTML: The Definitive Guide, Fifth Edition. I haven't been able to get this to work in IE8, Firefox 3.6, or Chrome 7.0. –  Paul Keister Nov 22 '10 at 19:20
    
I know its 2012...but this answer helped me...to support the landscape option for IE8...thanks –  Vikram Jul 24 '12 at 19:54
-webkit-transform: rotate(-90deg); -moz-transform:rotate(-90deg);
     filter:progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.BasicImage(rotation=3);

not working in Firefox 16.0.2 but it is working in Chrome

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also not working in IE –  farid bekran Apr 7 '13 at 7:26
<style type="text/css" media="print">
.landscape { 
    width: 100%; 
    height: 100%; 
    margin: 0% 0% 0% 0%; filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.BasicImage(Rotation=1); 
} 
</style>

If you want this style to be applied to a table then create one div tag with this style class and add the table tag within this div tag and close the div tag at the end.

This table will only print in landscape and all other pages will print in portrait mode only. But the problem is if the table size is more than the page width then we may loose some of the rows and sometimes headers also are missed. Be careful.

Have a good day.

Thank you, Naveen Mettapally.

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This rotates the contents of the screen by 90 degrees but the printout still comes out in protrait format. The worst of both worlds really, at least in ie8. –  arame3333 Feb 9 '12 at 8:49

This also worked for me:

@media print and (orientation:landscape) { … }
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In which browsers did you test? –  Mike Kormendy Nov 17 at 17:53

I tried to solve this problem once, but all my research led me towards ActiveX controls/plug-ins. There is no trick that the browsers (3 years ago anyway) permitted to change any print settings (number of copies, paper size).

I put my efforts into warning the user carefully that they needed to select "landscape" when the browsers print dialog appeared. I also created a "print preview" page, which worked much better than IE6's did! Our application had very wide tables of data in some reports, and the print preview made it clear to the users when the table would spill off the right-edge of the paper (since IE6 couldnt cope with printing on 2 sheets either).

And yes, people are still using IE6 even now.

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My solutios is:

<style type="text/css" media="print">
    @page { 
        size: landscape;
    }
    body { 
        writing-mode: tb-rl;
    }
</style>

This works in IE, Firefox and Chrome

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