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I'm trying to implement the C# aspect of a LightWeight JSON Spec JsonR, but cannot get my head around any kind of recursion :-/ If anyone could help out here it would be more than greatly appreciated.

// Mockup class
public class User {
    public string Name { get; set; }    
    public int Age     { get; set; }
    public List<string> Photos  { get; set; }
    public List<Friend> Friends { get; set; }       
}

// Mockup class
public class Friend {
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName  { get; set; }
}

// Initialize objects
var userList = new List<User>();
userList.Add(new User() { 
    Name   = "Robert",
    Age     = 32,
    Photos  = new List<string> { "1.jpg", "2.jpg" },
    Friends = new List<Friend>() {
        new Friend() { FirstName = "Bob", LastName = "Hope"},
        new Friend() { FirstName = "Mr" , LastName = "T"}
    }
}); 
userList.Add(new User() { 
    Name   = "Jane",
    Age     = 21,
    Photos  = new List<string> { "4.jpg", "5.jpg" },
    Friends = new List<Friend>() {
        new Friend() { FirstName = "Foo"  , LastName = "Bar"},
        new Friend() { FirstName = "Lady" , LastName = "Gaga"}
    }
});

The idea behind it all is to now take the above object and split it into 2 separate collections, one containing the keys, and the other containing the values. Like this we can eventually only send the values over the wire thus saving lots of bandwidth, and then recombine it on the client (a js implementation for recombining exists already)

If all went well we should be able to get this out of the above object

var keys   = new object[] {
    "Name", "Age", "Photos",
    new { Friends = new [] {"FirstName", "LastName"}}};
var values = new [] {
    new object[] {"Robert", 32, new [] {"1.jpg", "2.jpg"},
                                new [] { new [] {"Bob", "Hope"},
                                         new [] {"Mr", "T"}}},
    new object[] {"Jane", 21, new [] {"4.jpg", "5.jpg"},
                              new [] { new [] {"Foo", "Bar"},
                                       new [] {"Lady", "Gaga"}}}};

As a verification we can test the conformity of the result with

Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConvert.SerializeObject(keys).Dump("keys");
// Generates:
// ["Name","Age","Photos",{"Friends":["FirstName","LastName"]}]

Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConvert.SerializeObject(values).Dump("values");
// Generates:
// [["Robert",32,["1.jpg","2.jpg"],[["Bob","Hope"],["Mr","T"]]],["Jane",21,["4.jpg","5.jpg"],[["Foo","Bar"],["Lady","Gaga"]]]]

A shortcut i explored was to take advantage of Newton's JArray/JObject facilities like this

var JResult = Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConvert.DeserializeObject(
    Newtonsoft.Json.JsonConvert.SerializeObject(userList));

Like this we end up with a sort of array object that we can already start iterating on

Anyone think they can crack this in a memory/speed efficient way ?

share|improve this question
    
Of course if someone can crack this you'll get full credits for it in the JsonR project. Heck, I'll even give up half of my reputation points, or donate to your beerfund if that's what it takes :) – Robert Dec 12 '12 at 15:42
    
Did you rule out Reflection? It's not exactly speedy but it will provide a way to handle whatever data structure you throw at it. – dutzu Dec 12 '12 at 15:46
    
@dutzu no i didn't rule anything out at all, however we can be dealing with millions of requests/day depending on who uses it, since it's destined to be the serializer part on the webserver's end. That's one reason i thought of the JObject/JArray shortcut, since NewtonSoft will already take some pretty heavy lifting out of it, ..if going that path. But i might be wrong.. – Robert Dec 12 '12 at 15:50
    
Do you want a generic object serialiser? How should the elements be ordered? – Jodrell Dec 12 '12 at 15:53
1  
@Robert I'm working on a solution (purely for my own exercise). You have to use reflection there's no other way around it, however you can cache the dynamic serializers around the known types. So once you've used it once, next time there is no reflection, just pulling the de-serializer out of cache. – Stan R. Dec 12 '12 at 15:56
up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

I have a solution that works with your example data. It is not a universal solution and may fail with other examples, but it shows how to use recursions. I did not include any error handling. A real-world solution would have to.

I use this helper method which gets the item type of the generic lists:

private static Type GetListItemType(Type listType)
{
    Type itemType = null;
    foreach (Type interfaceType in listType.GetInterfaces()) {
        if (interfaceType.IsGenericType &&
            interfaceType.GetGenericTypeDefinition() == typeof(IList<>)) {
            itemType = interfaceType.GetGenericArguments()[0];
            break;
        }
    }
    return itemType;
}

Now, the recursion:

public void SplitKeyValues(IList source, List<object> keys, List<object> values)
{
    Type itemType = GetListItemType(source.GetType());
    PropertyInfo[] properties = itemType.GetProperties();
    for (int i = 0; i < source.Count; i++) {
        object item = source[i];
        var itemValues = new List<object>();
        values.Add(itemValues);
        foreach (PropertyInfo prop in properties) {
            if (typeof(IList).IsAssignableFrom(prop.PropertyType) &&
                prop.PropertyType.IsGenericType) {
                // We have a List<T> or array

                Type genericArgType = GetListItemType(prop.PropertyType);
                if (genericArgType.IsValueType || genericArgType == typeof(string)) {
                    // We have a list or array of a simple type
                    if (i == 0)
                        keys.Add(prop.Name);
                    List<object> subValues = new List<object>();
                    itemValues.Add(subValues);
                    subValues.AddRange(
                        Enumerable.Cast<object>(
                            (IEnumerable)prop.GetValue(item, null)));
                } else {
                    // We have a list or array of a complex type
                    List<object> subKeys = new List<object>();
                    if (i == 0)
                        keys.Add(subKeys);
                    List<object> subValues = new List<object>();
                    itemValues.Add(subValues);
                    SplitKeyValues(
                        (IList)prop.GetValue(item, null), subKeys, subValues);
                }
            } else if (prop.PropertyType.IsValueType ||
                       prop.PropertyType == typeof(string)) {
                // We have a simple type
                if (i == 0)
                    keys.Add(prop.Name);
                itemValues.Add(prop.GetValue(item, null));
            } else {
                // We have a complex type.
                // Does not occur in your example
            }
        }
    }
}

I call it like this:

List<User> userList = InitializeObjects();
List<object> keys = new List<object>();
List<object> values = new List<object>();
SplitKeyValues(userList, keys, values);

InitializeObjects initializes the user list as you did above.


UPDATE

The problem is that you are using an anonymous type new { Friends = ... }. You would have to create an anonymous type dynamically by using reflection. And that's pretty nasty. The article "Extend Anonymous Types using Reflection.Emit" seems to do it. (I didn't test it).

Maybe an easier approach would do the job. I suggest creating a helper class for the description of class types.

public class Class
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public List<object> Structure { get; set; }
}

Now let's replace an else case in the code above:

...
} else {
    // We have a list or array of a complex type
    List<object> subKeys = new List<object>();
    var classDescr = new Class { Name = genericArgType.Name, Structure = subKeys };
    if (i == 0)
        keys.Add(classDescr);
    List<object> subValues = new List<object>();
    itemValues.Add(subValues);
    SplitKeyValues(
        (IList)prop.GetValue(item, null), subKeys, subValues);
}
...

The result is: enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
I'm don't have access to a real pc right now, but once i get back home I'll be sure to give this a try, tnx! – Robert Dec 15 '12 at 18:35
    
Got back home and gave your code a try ..pretty sweet ! The values generated are perfect, unfortunately the keys loose the friends object. Generated: ["Name","Age","Photos",["FirstName","LastName"]] Expected: ["Name","Age","Photos",{"Friends":["FirstName","LastName"]}]. Do you think this can be achieved with your code, or is it always just arrays ? I'm gonna play a bit with it, but reflection & recursion are a bit beyond me. In any case this looks the most promising so far – Robert Dec 16 '12 at 21:13
    
I guess the user object could also be expressed as {User: ["Name","Age","Photos", {"Friends": ["FirstName","LastName"]}]} if that makes more sense. However in the end we will be returning {Type: "User", Keys: ["Name","Age","Photos", {"Friends": ["FirstName","LastName"]}], Values: [....]} Actually it will either be keys/values, or type/values (with keys stored in a look-up dictionary on the client), never all three. – Robert Dec 16 '12 at 21:25
    
Haven't tried your updated example, but i currently am able to make things work by replacing keys.Add(subKeys) inside // We have a list or array of a complex type with keys.Add(new Dictionary<string, object>(1) {{prop.Name, subKeys}}). This seems to do the trick. I'll investigate your updated example though, unless you think my tweak is good enough ..i'm just doing a bunch of trial/error, not even 100% sure if i'm not doing nasty things here ! :) – Robert Dec 17 '12 at 0:26
    
Gonna consider this OK ! :) Now just need to wrap it all up in a nice transparent method with some error handling and helper logic to get nice JsonResults in MVC, and something similar in asp.net ..but that's the easy part. Thanks again, and if you have some extra tips or whatever, i'm all ears. ..oh and outta curiosity. What on earth where you using this for ? – Robert Dec 17 '12 at 1:04

You may want to try an external tool, like AutoMapper, which is a convention based mapping library.

I suggest to try the flattening feature with your own conventions.

I'm sorry I cannot write out an example because of lack of time, but I think the ideas behind this open source library might help a lot.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion, but i think the above code from Olivier will do the trick just nicely. I really do prefer just a extra function or 2 to achieve the result, than adding supplementary dependencies. ..but if Olivier hadn't posted his solution i might have gone that route :) – Robert Dec 17 '12 at 0:56
    
Olivier did a nice code, +1 for it ! – Larry Dec 17 '12 at 10:37

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