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While helping a friend with a git problem today, I had to introduce a branch that needed to be totally separate from the master branch. The contents of this branch really had a different origin from what had been developed on the master branch, but they were going to be merged into the master branch at a later time.

I remembered from reading John Wiegley's Git from the bottom up how branches are essentially a label to a commit that follows a certain convention and how a commit is tied to a tree of files and, optionally to parent commits. We went to create a parentless commit to the existing repository using git's plumbing:

So we got rid of all files in the index ...

$ git rm -rf .

... extracted directories and files from a tarball, added those to the index ...

$ git add .

... and created a tree object ...

$ git write-tree

(git-write-tree told us the sha1sum of the created tree object.)

Then, We committed the tree, without specifying parent commits...

$ echo "Imported project foo" | git commit-tree $TREE

(git-commit-tree told us the sha1sum of the created commit object.)

... and created a new branch that points to our newly created commit.

$ git update-ref refs/heads/other-branch $COMMIT

Finally, we returned to the master branch to continue work there.

$ git checkout -f master

This seems to have worked as planned. But this is clearly not the kind of procedure I would recommend to someone who is just getting started using git, to put it mildly. Is there an easier way of creating a new branch that is entirely unrelated to everything that has happened in the repository so far?

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6 Answers

up vote 181 down vote accepted

In case anyone new comes across this question, there is a new feature which makes this task a little more high-level than what's in any of the other answers.

git checkout now supports the --orphan option. From the man page:

git checkout [-q] [-f] [-m] --orphan <new_branch> [<start_point>]

Create a new orphan branch, named <new_branch>, started from <start_point> and switch to it. The first commit made on this new branch will have no parents and it will be the root of a new history totally disconnected from all the other branches and commits.

This doesn't do exactly what the asker wanted, because it populates the index and the working tree from <start_point> (since this is, after all, a checkout command). The only other action necessary is to remove any unwanted items from the working tree and index. Unfortunately, git reset --hard doesn't work, but git rm -rf . can be used instead (I believe this is equivalent to rm .git/index; git clean -fdx given in other answers).


In summary:

git checkout --orphan newbranch
git rm -rf .
<do work>
git add your files
git commit -m 'Initial commit'

I left <start_point> unspecified because it defaults to HEAD, and we don't really care anyway. This sequence does essentially the same thing as the command sequence in Artem's answer, just without resorting to scary plumbing commands.

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13  
note: This feature was added in git 1.7.2 –  Matthew Feb 11 '11 at 1:26
    
Do you know if it is possible to create an orphan branch that stays visible when you checkout any branch from the other "tree"? –  JJD Jun 7 '11 at 16:38
1  
@JJD: I think what you want is git merge. ( git checkout master && git merge --no-commit "orphan-branch" ) Some similar tricks will work using git-reset or playing with the index. But it depends on your desired workflow. –  phord Sep 29 '11 at 23:40
    
@Matthew Here is the changelog for git 1.7.2. –  JJD Sep 30 '11 at 10:05
2  
@JJD: The script I gave should give you what you want, unless I misunderstood you. When you said "stays visible", do you mean the files will remain in the working directory even though you checked out a different branch? Using --no-commit on git merge will achieve this. You may need to follow up with a git reset origin/master so your next commit goes where you want, but then the files from your orphan-branch will show up as "untracked files" unless you also include them in your .gitignore file. –  phord Oct 3 '11 at 18:24
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From Git Community Book:

git symbolic-ref HEAD refs/heads/newbranch 
rm .git/index 
git clean -fdx 
<do work> 
git add your files 
git commit -m 'Initial commit'
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3  
This is a great answer. –  gahooa Sep 5 '09 at 22:00
1  
Next answer is better for modern versions of git. –  kikito Apr 3 '12 at 21:50
    
@kikito: Re: "Next answer is better" ... The ordering here on SO is not stable. Could you add a link pointing to what you think is a better answer. –  David James Jan 8 at 16:09
    
I was referring to stackoverflow.com/a/4288660/312586. You are right, I should not have said "next". It had less score than this answer when I commented. –  kikito Jan 8 at 16:32
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Although the solution with git symbolic-ref and removing index works, it might be conceptually cleaner to create new repository

$ cd /path/to/unrelated
$ git init
[edit and add files]
$ git add .
$ git commit -m "Initial commit of unrelated"
[master (root-commit) 2a665f6] Initial commit of unrelated
 1 files changed, 1 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)
 create mode 100644 foo

then fetch from it

$ cd /path/to/repo
$ git fetch /path/to/unrelated master:unrelated-branch
warning: no common commits
remote: Counting objects: 3, done.
Unpacking objects: 100% (3/3), done.
remote: Total 3 (delta 0), reused 0 (delta 0)
From /path/to/unrelated
 * [new branch]      master     -> unrelated-branch

Now you can delete /path/to/unrelated

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In my opinion, a clean concept would involve an option to git branch or git checkout. I'm glad that git makes this sort of stuff possible, but why shouldn't it be easier? –  hillu Sep 6 '09 at 12:05
3  
Because it is, and should be a rare thing. If you have unrelated things branch, it usually belongs to unrelated repository, instead of stuffing it in existing one (although there are exceptions). –  Jakub Narębski Sep 6 '09 at 13:05
1  
+1. For fellow git newbies, you can apparently then list the branches via git branch and switch between them via git checkout BRANCH_NAME. –  akavel Dec 14 '11 at 10:08
    
Thanks for this, I wouldn't have thought about it on my own. This is extra helpful because it maintains the history (if there is any) for the other repo. –  BM5k Jul 8 '12 at 18:21
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Github has a feature called Project Pages where you can create a particular named branch in your project to provide files that will be served by Github. Their instructions are as follows:

$ cd /path/to/fancypants
$ git symbolic-ref HEAD refs/heads/gh-pages
$ rm .git/index
$ git clean -fdx

From there you have an empty repository which you can then add your new content to.

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The currently selected answer is correct, I would just add that coincidentally...

This is actually exactly how github.com lets users create Github Pages for their repos, thru an orphaned branch called gh-pages. The pretty steps are given and explained here:

https://help.github.com/articles/creating-project-pages-manually

Hope this helps!

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Found this script at http://wingolog.org/archives/2008/10/14/merging-in-unrelated-git-branches and it works very fine !

#!/bin/bash

set -e

if test -z "$2" -o -n "$3"; then
    echo "usage: $0 REPO BRANCHNAME" >&2
    exit 1
fi

repo=$1
branch=$2

git fetch "$repo" "$branch"

head=$(git rev-parse HEAD)
fetched=$(git rev-parse FETCH_HEAD)
headref=$(git rev-parse --symbolic-full-name HEAD)

git checkout $fetched .

tree=$(git write-tree)

newhead=$(echo "merged in branch '$branch' from $repo" | git commit-tree $tree -p $head -p $fetched)
git update-ref $headref $newhead $head
git reset --hard $headref
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1  
I believe that the same effect can be achieved using git fetch $REMOTE $REMOTE_BRANCH:$LOCAL_BRANCH. Am I missing something? –  hillu Aug 25 '10 at 6:41
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