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Currently, I have some code as follows

template<typename Type>
Type* getValue(std::string name, bool tryUseGetter = true)
{
	if(tryUseGetter)
	{
		if(_properties[name]->hasGetter)
		{
			return (Type*)_properties[name]->getter();
		}
		return (Type*)_properties[name]->data;
	}
	else
	{
		return (Type*)_properties[name]->data;
	}
}

Is there a way to make tryUseGetter a compile time switch? i.e. move it to the template declaration so it's something akin to this

template<typename Type, bool tryUseGetter = true>
...

Thanks.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could use type cast operator and structure getValue as follows (usage syntax will be the same as with function) :

template<typename Type, bool tryUseGetter = true> 
struct getValue {};

template<typename Type>
struct getValue<Type, true> {
    getValue(const std::string& name) : name(name) {};
    operator Type*() const {
    	if(_properties[name]->hasGetter) {
    		return (Type*)_properties[name]->getter();
    	}
    	return (Type*)_properties[name]->data;
    }
private:
    const std::string& name;
};

template<typename Type>
struct getValue<Type, false> {
    getValue(const std::string& name) : name(name) {};
    operator Type*() const {
    	return (Type*)_properties[name]->data;
    }
private:
    const std::string& name;
};

Usage:

int main () {
    int* i = getValue<int>( "TEST" ); // true by default
    Xstruct* x = getValue<Xstruct, false>( "XS" ); // false
}
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As an alternative to Dirk's answer, you can put the function in a struct. Template classes can be partially specialized (in contrast to template functions), so you can write:

template<typename Type, bool tryUseGetter = true>
struct getValue;

template<typename Type>
struct getValue<Type, true>
{
    Type* run(std::string name)
    {
    	if(_properties[name]->hasGetter)
    	{
    		return (Type*)_properties[name]->getter();
    	}
    	return (Type*)_properties[name]->data;
    }
};

template<typename Type>
struct getValue<Type, false>
{
    Type* run(std::string name)
    {
    	return (Type*)_properties[name]->data;
    }
};

Call it as getValue<T>::run("foo") or getValue<T, false>::run("foo") .

I'm not 100% certain that it's allowed to have template parameters of the type bool, so perhaps you should change it to int.

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Any POD type is allowed as a template parameter. A string for instance isn't. –  the_drow Sep 5 '09 at 22:50
    
Just because POD means "plain old datatype" doesn't mean that PODs may be used anywhere. POD structs aren't allowed as template parameters. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 5 '09 at 23:05
2  
bool is an integral type, so is allowed to be a 'non-type' template parameter. Non-type template parameters can be integral types, enumerations, pointers (to object, function or member) or references (to object or function) –  Michael Burr Sep 5 '09 at 23:38

You can get compile-time dispatch of the "try-use-getter" stuff by splitting your method into two and having the compiler dispatch to the appropriate method:

struct __try_use_getter { }

external const __try_use_getter tryusegetter;

template<typename Type> 
Type* 
getValue(std::string name, const __try_use_getter&)
{
    if(_properties[name]->hasGetter)
    {
        return (Type*)_properties[name]->getter();
    }
    return (Type*)_properties[name]->data;
}

template<typename Type> 
Type* 
getValue(std::string name)
{
    return (Type*)_properties[name]->data;
}

With this scenario in place, you would have full compile-time dispatching:

int result = getValue("foo", tryusegetter);

would try the getter first, whereas

int result = getValue("foo");

would immediately call the getter-less version.

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Just in case you really need it (although from a performance point of view, i doubt it would be noticeable), i would overload

template<typename Type>
Type* getValue(std::string const &name)
{
    if(_properties[name]->hasGetter)
    {
        return (Type*)_properties[name]->getter();
    }
    return (Type*)_properties[name]->data;
}

template<typename Type, bool tryUseGetter>
Type *getValue(std::string const &name) 
{
    if(tryUseGetter)
    {
        return getValue<Type>(name);
    }
    else
    {
        return (Type*)_properties[name]->data;
    }
}

Also, you should first follow the real rules: Pass name by-const-reference instead of passing a copy, for example.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm wrapping this with boost:bind and I can't seem to get references to work. –  jameszhao00 Sep 5 '09 at 23:33
    
Then i recommend you to ask another question to get that right first, before wasting time on this stuff –  Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 6 '09 at 0:32
    
@jameszhao00, I think that my answer will give you ability to use boost::bind. –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Sep 6 '09 at 6:35

Before you go and make the code all complicated...did you check to see if the optimizing compiler was already doing this for you?

share|improve this answer
    
Yea I was thinking that too. I purposely duplicated parts of code so the branches are totally separated. –  jameszhao00 Sep 5 '09 at 23:45
    
By the way, I ran valgrind/cachegrind on my app and it turns out that comparison wasn't optimized away. –  jameszhao00 Sep 6 '09 at 17:40

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