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I am asking for a concrete case for Java + JPA / Hibernate + Mysql, but I think you can apply this question to a great number of languages.

Sometimes I have to perform a query on a database to get some entities, such as employees. Let's say you need some specific employees (the ones with 'John' as their firstname), would you rather do a query returning this exact set of employees, or would you prefer to search for all the employees and then use a programming language to retrieve the ones that you are interested with? why (ease, efficiency)? Which is (in general) more efficient?

Is one approach better than the other depending on the table size?

Considering:

  • Same complexity, reusability in both cases.
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closed as primarily opinion-based by pnuts, Andy, Elliott Frisch, David, dmckee Dec 21 '13 at 2:47

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
What is better: to store a lot of food at home or buy it little by little? When you travel a lot? Just when hosting a party? It depends, isn't? Similarly, the best approach is a matter of performance optimization. That involves a lot of variables. The art is to both prevent painting yourself into a corner when designing your solution and optimize later, when you know your real bottlenecks. A good starting point is here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Performance_tuning One think could be more or less universally helpful: encapsulate your data access well. –  full.stack.ex Dec 12 '12 at 18:22
    
I would say your answer is really the one that you can learn most! –  dgarcia Dec 13 '12 at 9:09
    
@ dgarcia, thank you. I'm promoting it into an answer in case you want one to accept. –  full.stack.ex Dec 16 '12 at 16:47
    
I would say this is not a opinion-based question. I specified clearly what were the premises. The answer is it depends, but it DOES not depend on opinion, depend on what you want to do. Depends on your database and if it is better for your application to use more memory or access more the database. But this depends on the NEEDS of your system, not on opinions. –  dgarcia Jan 9 at 22:04
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7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There is a general trick often used in programming - paying with memory for operation speedup. If you have lots of employees, and you are going to query a significant portion of them, one by one (say, 75% will be queried at one time or the other), then query everything, cache it (very important!), and complete the lookup in memory. The next time you query, skip the trip to RDBMS, go straight to the cache, and do a fast look-up: a roundtrip to a database is very expensive, compared to an in-memory hash lookup.

On the other hand, if you are accessing a small portion of employees, you should query just one employee: data transfer from the RDBMS to your program takes a lot of time, a lot of network bandwidth, a lot of memory on your side, and a lot of memory on the RDBMS side. Querying lots of rows to throw away all but one never makes sense.

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Always do the query on the database. If you do not you have to copy over more data to the client and also databases are written to efficiently filter data almost certainly being more efficient than your code.

The only exception I can think of is if the filter condition is computationally complex and you can spread the calculation over more CPU power than the database has.

In the cases I have had a database the server has had more CPU power than the clients so unless overloaded will just run the query more quickly for the same amount of code.

Also you have to write less code to do the query on the database using Hibernates query language rather than you having to write code to manipulate the data on the client. Hibernate queries will also make use of any client caching in the configiration without you having to write more code.

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In general, I would let the database do what databases are good at. Filtering data is something databases are really good at, so it would be best left there.

That said, there are some situations where you might just want to grab all of them and do the filtering in code though. One I can think of would be if the number of rows is relatively small and you plan to cache them in your app. In that case you would just look up all the rows, cache them, and do subsequent filtering against what you have in the cache.

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It's situational. I think in general, it's better to use sql to get the exact result set.

The problem with loading all the entities and then searching programmatically is that you ahve to load all the entitites, which could take a lot of memory. Additionally, you have to then search all the entities. Why do that when you can leverage your RDBMS and get the exact results you want. In other words, why load a large dataset that could use too much memory, then process it, when you can let your RDBMS do the work for you?

On the other hand, if you know the size of your dataset is not too, you can load it into memory and then query it -- this has the advantage that you don't need to go to the RDBMS, which might or might not require going over your network, depending on your system architecture.

However, even then, you can use various caching utilities so that the common query results are cached, which removes the advantage of caching the data yourself.

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Remember, that your approach should scale over time. What may be a small data set could later turn into a huge data set over time. We had an issue with a programmer that coded the application to query the entire table then run manipulations on it. The approach worked fine when there were only 100 rows with two subselects, but as the data grew over the years, the performance issues became apparent. Inserting even a date filter to query only the last 365 days, could help your application scale better.

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-- if you are looking for an answer specific to hibernate, check @Mark's answer

Given the Employee example -assuming the number of employees can scale over time, it is better to use an approach to query the database for the exact data. However, if you are considering something like Department (for example), where the chances of the data growing rapidly is less, it is useful to query all of them and have in memory - this way you don't have to reach to the external resource (database) every time, which could be costly.

So the general parameters are these,

  1. scaling of data
  2. criticality to bussiness
  3. volume of data
  4. frequency of usage

to put some sense, when the data is not going to scale frequently and the data is not mission critical and volume of data is manageable in memory on the application server and is used frequently - Bring it all and filter them programatically, if needed.

if otherwise get only specific data.

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What is better: to store a lot of food at home or buy it little by little? When you travel a lot? Just when hosting a party? It depends, isn't? Similarly, the best approach is a matter of performance optimization. That involves a lot of variables. The art is to both prevent painting yourself into a corner when designing your solution and optimize later, when you know your real bottlenecks. A good starting point is here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Performance_tuning One think could be more or less universally helpful: encapsulate your data access well.

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I didn't choose it as answer because it is not 'answering' straightly the main topic, although I think it's quite useful –  dgarcia Dec 18 '12 at 10:01
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