Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to know if the following code which is meant to do operations on rational numbers actually already overloads assignment operations and stream insertion operator << to print objects. I'm not very good with C++ so this is new to me but from what i can tell i think it already does. Thank you!

    /*
 *
 *  C++ version
 *
 */

/* rational.h */

#ifndef RATIONAL_H
#define RATIONAL_H

#include <iostream>

using std::ostream;

struct rational {

    rational(int = 0, int = 1);

    rational operator+(const rational &) const;
    rational operator-(const rational &) const;
    rational operator*(const rational &) const;
    rational operator/(const rational &) const;

    rational operator+(int) const;
    rational operator-(int) const;
    rational operator*(int) const;
    rational operator/(int) const;

    friend rational operator+(int, const rational &);
    friend rational operator-(int, const rational &);
    friend rational operator*(int, const rational &);
    friend rational operator/(int, const rational &);

    friend ostream &operator<<(ostream &, const rational &);

private:

    int den;
    int num;
};

#endif /* RATIONAL_H */

/* rational.cc */

#include <iostream>
#include "rational.h"

rational::rational(int num, int den) : num(num), den(den) {}

rational rational::operator+(const rational &o) const {

    return rational(num * o.den + o.num * den, den * o.den);
}

rational rational::operator+(int n) const {

    return rational(num + n * den, den);
}

rational rational::operator-(const rational &o) const {

    return rational(num * o.den - o.num * den, den * o.den);
}

rational rational::operator-(int n) const {

    return rational(num - n * den, den);
}

rational rational::operator*(const rational &o) const {

    return rational(num * o.num, den * o.den);
}

rational rational::operator*(int n) const {

    return rational(num * n, den);
}

rational rational::operator/(const rational &o) const {

    return rational(num * o.den, den * o.num);
}

rational rational::operator/(int n) const {

    return rational(num, den * n);
}

rational operator+(int n, const rational &o) {

    return o + n;
}

rational operator-(int n, const rational &o) {

    return rational(n) - o;
}

rational operator*(int n, const rational &o) {

    return o * n;
}

rational operator/(int n, const rational &o) {

    return rational(n) / o;
}

ostream &operator<<(ostream &out, const rational &o) {

    out << '(' << o.num << " / " << o.den << ')';
    return out;
}

/* main.cc */

#include <iostream>
#include "rational.h"

using std::cout;
using std::endl;

int main(void) {

    rational a(1, 2);
    rational b(2, 3);

    int i = 5;

    cout << a << " + " << b << " = " << a + b << endl;
    cout << a << " - " << b << " = " << a - b << endl;
    cout << a << " * " << b << " = " << a * b << endl;
    cout << a << " / " << b << " = " << a / b << endl;

    cout << a << " + " << i << " = " << a + i << endl;
    cout << a << " - " << i << " = " << a - i << endl;
    cout << a << " * " << i << " = " << a * i << endl;
    cout << a << " / " << i << " = " << a / i << endl;

    cout << i << " + " << a << " = " << i + a << endl;
    cout << i << " - " << a << " = " << i - a << endl;
    cout << i << " * " << a << " = " << i * a << endl;
    cout << i << " / " << a << " = " << i / a << endl;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The operator<< is ok (you can write it in one line though, but it doesn’t matter here):

ostream &operator<<(ostream &out, const rational &o) {
    return out << '(' << o.num << " / " << o.den << ')';
}

However, you haven’t defined assignment operators yet!

rational & rational::operator=(rational const &rhs) {
    den = rhs.den;
    num = rhs.num;
    return *this;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I just need one function(the one you provided)? –  user1880760 Dec 12 '12 at 16:01
    
You can use the operator= I gave you, yes. The version of alestanis also works now, but the this-> is optional (he must be from Java world ;) ) –  phaazon Dec 12 '12 at 16:05
    
and the constructor is okay too right? –  user1880760 Dec 12 '12 at 16:06
    
well, you shouldn’t use the same name for ctor params and attributes. It will work with some compilers, and will crash as shit on others. Prefer the below: –  phaazon Dec 12 '12 at 16:07
    
rational::rational(int n, int d) : num(n), den(d) {} –  phaazon Dec 12 '12 at 16:09

Short answer: yes it does for << and arithmetic operations. It doesn't for assignment.

For example, this is the << overloading:

ostream &operator<<(ostream &out, const rational &o) {
    out << '(' << o.num << " / " << o.den << ')';
    return out;
}

To overload the assignment operator, you should write a function

rational& rational::operator=(const rational &o) {
    this->den = o.den;
    this->num = o.num;
    return *this;
}
share|improve this answer
    
your assignment operator can’t be used in assignment chain or in a loop/if statement. Plus, you can’t declare it as const since it mutates this. –  phaazon Dec 12 '12 at 15:55
    
@skp You're right, I edited –  alestanis Dec 12 '12 at 15:57
    
The assignment operator is totally unnecessary and superfluous. –  James Kanze Dec 12 '12 at 16:53

Both insertion and assignment are fine. The assignment operator (and the copy constructor) are provided by the compiler, which is fine in this case. If for some reason you do want to provide an assignment operator (or you need to for some other class), you almost certainly need to provide a copy constructor as well, and most of the time, a destructor. But that's not the case here; the compiler generated versions are fine (and what most C++ programmers would expect, I think).

With regards to the other comments on your code: the way you have written the constructor and the insertion operator is just fine, and is preferable to the suggested alternatives.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.