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Now that modern machines are all multi-core and we have support for SIMD instructions on Windows and Linux boxes with SSE instructions, for example, should I switch to merge sort in my C/C++ code and forget QuickSort? Theoretically, the reason for doing this is that merge sort will parallelize better and use memory/disk more sparingly and thus be faster than QuickSort's memory intensive operation, but I don't know. What does practical experience indicate?

I do not want to profile and test every time I sort something. I want to use one standard approach. Currently that approach is QuickSort, because that is the default library sorting routine. I want to know if there are others out there who have switched to MergeSort and experienced better results by making that switchover.

UPDATE------------

Graham.Reeds answer to How big is the performance gap between std::sort and std::stable_sort in practice? indicates that anecdotally my guess above is right and switching to MergeSort/stablesort may be correct.

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closed as not constructive by Ken White, WhozCraig, Ram kiran, hims056, Deefour Dec 14 '12 at 4:21

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And, of course, there's also introsort: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Introsort –  NPE Dec 12 '12 at 15:54
    
It's hard to generalize when it comes to performance. Measure and see. –  Mark Ransom Dec 12 '12 at 15:54
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The truth of the matter is the same as it always has been. Everything depends on the data and the specific needs of your app. That hasn't changed. –  Ken White Dec 12 '12 at 15:55
    
Have you considered using std::sort? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Dec 12 '12 at 15:56
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@Tyler: std::stable_sort is set up to be a merge sort (not explicitly required, but the requirements certainly steer you in that direction), so it should be easy enough to compare your standard library's implementation of each. Beyond that I suspect the question becomes "can I beat my standard library's sort implementation?", to which the answer is "yes, but". –  Steve Jessop Dec 12 '12 at 16:42
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5 Answers

should I switch to merge sort in my C/C++ code and forget QuickSort?

Sorry to say this, but the question sounds like an attempt at premature optimization.

Theoretically, the reason for doing this is that merge sort will parallelize better and use memory/disk more sparingly and thus be faster than QuickSort's memory intensive operation, but I don't know. What does practical experience indicate?

Practically, you should always profile first, then decide on areas of optimization based on results.

It is probable that you may not even have to change the sorting algorithm you use, unless you do it over a big-enough data set for the results to matter (or in a critical-enough area of your processing flow, to matter).

I usually use std::sort, and if that isn't enough (that hasn't happened yet for std::sort) I optimize my application flow and algorithms.

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The truth is you have to profile it yourself and see how it behaves for your application, data, environment, etc. This is, essentially, the answer to something like 99% of all profiling/performance/optimization questions on SO.

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I don't think there's a definitive answer. Parallelisable brute-force sorts may well be faster in some circumstances. It's always important to analyse your particular case. Consider also the bitonic sort, for example, if you have multiple cores and SIMD.

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There are parallel sort packages that are scalable by the number of cores in the processor and are designed to utilize/optimize the processing on the each processor. I know that TBB (Threading Building Blocks) has a parallel_sort function which is a comparison sort with an average time complexity 0(n log n).

You could also implement some threading into the Quick sort. Recursive functions convert to parallelism easily using parallel_for in TBB or you can look into Cilk Plus, there are many threaded examples on the net.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

After getting a lot of non-answers, I spent a few hours and did my own research. The result of this is that, yes, merge sort (and other related sorts) are going to be significantly faster due to less intensive use of memory, and better parallelization/multicore exploitation. Moreover, there is a a standard, high-performance library by Intel called IPP that implements merge-type sorts for x86 machines. By switching to this library it looks like I can get greatly improved sorting performance (and other vector type operations) for the types of programming I do.

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