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I'm a newbie at Scheme, so forgive the question: I have a function that calculates the factorials of a list of numbers, but it gives me a period before the last number in the results. Where am I going wrong?

code:

#lang scheme

 (define fact
    (lambda (n)
      (cond
        ((= n 0) 1)
        ((= n 1) 1)
        (else (* n (fact (- n 1)))))))

 (define fact*
   (lambda (l)
     (cond
       ((null? (cdr l)) (fact (car l)))
       (else
        (cons (fact (car l)) (fact* (cdr l)))))))

output:

> (fact* '(3 6 7 2 4 5))
(6 720 5040 2 24 . 120)
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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

What you have done is create an improper list. Try this:

(define fact*
   (lambda (l)
     (cond
       ((null? (cdr l)) (list (fact (car l))))
       (else
        (cons (fact (car l)) (fact* (cdr l)))))))

The addition of the list in the fourth line should make this work as you expect. Better might be the following:

(define fact*
   (lambda (l)
     (cond
       (null? l) '())
       (else
        (cons (fact (car l)) (fact* (cdr l)))))))

This allows your fact* function to work on the empty list, as well as reducing the number of places where you make a call to fact.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Is there a way to do that with Scheme primitives? Is list a primitive? –  Isaac Sep 5 '09 at 22:35
1  
I edited to add the second implementation after your comment above. Does that answer your question? –  Greg Hewgill Sep 5 '09 at 22:39
    
Ah, superb! My "Little Schemer" knowledge was forgotten momentarily. Thank you! –  Isaac Sep 5 '09 at 22:41
1  
I don't know if you know (or even if it's relevant), but there's a scheme primitive called map. What it does is apply a given function to every member of a given list. So you could define fact* as (define fact* (lambda (l) (map fact l))), and it would work the same way. Of course, you should know how to do it without using map first! –  configurator Sep 16 '10 at 20:29
    
D'oh! Just noticed exactly what I said as a later answer! –  configurator Sep 16 '10 at 20:31

The other answers have pointed out the reason why you get an improper list as a result of your fact* function. I would only like to point out that you could use the higher-order function map:

(define fact*
  (lambda (l)
    (map fact l))

(fact* '(3 6 7 2 4 5))

map takes a function and a list as arguments and applies the function to every element in the list, producing a new list.

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Use append instead of cons. cons is used to construct pairs, which is why you have the "." that is used to separate the elements of a pair. Here's an example:

(define (factorial n)
  (if (<= n 1)
      1
      (* n (factorial (- n 1)))))

(define (factorial-list l)
  (if (null? l)
      '()
      (append (list (factorial (car l))) 
              (factorial-list (cdr l)))))
share|improve this answer
    
Could you expand on that? Why exactly does the "." get inserted into my list when I cons an atom onto a list? –  Isaac Sep 5 '09 at 22:38
1  
A "pair" is an object that contains two atoms. A "list" is a sequence of pairs with the property that the cdr of each pair is another list, with the exception that the end of the list is indicated by the "empty list" atom. So (cons 'a (cons 'b (cons 'c '()))) is a proper list, but (cons 'a (cons 'b 'c)) is termed an "improper list" because the cdr of the second cons is not a list. –  Greg Hewgill Sep 5 '09 at 22:43
1  
Because in your final step, you are constructing a pair that consists of a list and an atom, e.g., (cons '(20 21) 120) => ((20 21) . 120). To make it work properly, you need to convert 120 into a list. –  João Silva Sep 5 '09 at 22:44
    
That makes sense - thanks to the both of you! –  Isaac Sep 5 '09 at 23:03

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