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This question is a curiosity of mine, so I'm not look for a away around this just an explanation.

I've been wondering why a new variable has to be created when you are casting.

It's the sort of thing I would have thought the compiler could work it's magic on as I am casting to a known type.

So that code like this could be written shorter.

DataTable dataTable = RetrieveDataTableFrom(whereEver);

foreach (DataRow row in dataTable.rows)
{
    if (row.ItemArray[0].GetType() == typeof(myTypeA))
    {
         MyTypeA myTypeA = (myTypeA)row.ItemArray[0];
         myTypeA.myCustomProperty = "dem works";
    }
}

Like this, where I just edit the property more directly.

foreach (DataRow row in dataTable.rows)
{
    if (row.ItemArray[0].GetType() == typeof(myTypeA))
    {
         (myTypeA)row.ItemArray[0].myCustomProperty = "dem breaks";
    }
}

Edit: Oh so a mistake in my understanding! Whoops, I thought it didn't make sense... ha. A little extra, would you consider either method (assuming correct amount of parentheses used) more clear/readable than the other?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, it's because you're actually not casting quite the right way in your second example.

((myTypeA)(row.ItemArray[0])).myCustomProperty = "dem breaks";

When casting, it's often important to be as clear as possible about what exactly you're trying to cast. In this case, adding a couple sets of parenthesis indicates to the compiler that you don't wan to cast row or row.ItemArray or row.ItemArray[0].myCustomProperty, but row.ItemArray[0], which is actually of type myTypeA.

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This should work

foreach (DataRow row in dataTable.rows)
{
    if (row.ItemArray[0].GetType() == typeof(myTypeA))
    {
         ((myTypeA)row.ItemArray[0]).myCustomProperty = "dem breaks";
    }
}

or you can use LINQ

foreach (var row in dataTable.Rows.Cast<DataRow>().Where(row => row.ItemArray[0].GetType() == typeof(myTypeA)))
{
   ((myTypeA)row.ItemArray[0]).myCustomProperty = "dem breaks";
}
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Always interesting to see alternative LINQ solutions +1 –  Amicable Dec 13 '12 at 14:39

You just need to add parentheses and it will work:

((myTypeA)row.ItemArray[0]).myCustomProperty = "dem breaks";
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A new reference will still be created in the second case, it will just be at a lower scope. Over the course of evaluating that complex statement a number of very short lived temporary variables will be created to store intermediate values; the result of your cast will be one of them.

Now that temporary object won't need to live for the entire lifetime of the if statement, the way the first example does (even though in practice the odds of a GC collection half way through that statement is...low), but that is unlikely to matter.

Also note the cast has nothing to do with this. Just writing:

object first = new object();
object second = first; //the reference is copied here

copies a reference. There need be no cast to do that.

Copying a reference is also not a slow operation. In fact, it is among the single fastest operations that can possibly be performed by a computer, that of taking a single word of memory and moving it.

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(row.ItemArray[0] as myTypeA).mycustomproperty = value
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You should add parentheses;

((myTypeA)row.ItemArray[0]).myCustomProperty = "dem breaks";
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