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My question is this: why does the following code:

class A
{
public:
    A()
    {
        test[0] = "three";
        test[5] = "five";
        test2[3] = 5.55;
    }
    void foo(int j)
    {
        for(int i = j+1; i <= 7; ++i)
        {
            try
            {
                std::cout<<test.at(i)<<"\n";
            }
            catch(const std::out_of_range&)
            {
                try
                {
                    std::cout<<test2.at(i)<<"\n";
                }
                catch(const std::out_of_range&)
                {
                    throw i;
                }
            }
        }
    }
    virtual void bar()
    {

    }
    std::map< int, float > test2;
    std::map<int, std::string> test;
};

class B : public A
{
public:
    B()
    {
        test3[6] = 15;
        test3[7] = 42;
        bar();
    }

    void bar()
    {
        int k = -1;
        label:
        try
        {
            foo(k);
        }
        catch(int i)
        {
            try
            {
                std::cout<<test3.at(i)<<"\n";
            }
            catch(const std::out_of_range&)
            {
                k = i;
                goto label;
            }
        }
    }

std::map<int, int> test3;
};

print

three
5.55
five
15

and not

three
5.55
five
15
42

?

What I'm trying to do is iterate over a number of maps containing different data types that can't be held in 1 container and this is what I came up with

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by interjay, ArtemStorozhuk, Mac, Mario, mu is too short Dec 12 '12 at 22:28

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
can you be more specific? –  segfault Dec 12 '12 at 17:04
2  
The short answer is "because the program flow is twisted enough to melt my brain". I can't give a longer answer without melting my brain. –  Mike Seymour Dec 12 '12 at 17:05
1  
you posted a messy spaghetti code! a goto inside a catch statement which refer to the try block above... very esotic :) Compiler should have had an hard time compiling it. Obviously that's spaghetti code with meatballs (that's OOP code) –  G_G Dec 12 '12 at 17:07
    
downvoters please provide an alternative or a reason why you downvoted –  user1233963 Dec 12 '12 at 17:09
1  
I really, really hope this isn't meant to illustrate the workings of some piece of production code. Instead of asking why this code doesn't do what you expect, perhaps your time would be better spent rewriting it to do exactly what you expect, in some kind of sane manner. –  Mac Dec 12 '12 at 21:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

My understanding is that what you need is:

  • You want to print all values contained in different maps over a certain range of keys.
  • The maps have different types of values. Not all keys are present in all maps.
  • A derived class may contain additional maps.

Instead of this convoluted exception+goto design, why not use a simpler design based on a virtual method for printing a specific value:

class A {
public:
    virtual void showValue(int key) {
        if (map1.count(key))
            std::cout << map1[key];
        else if (map2.count(key))
            std::cout << map2[key];
    }

    void showAll() {
        for (int i=0; i<=7; i++)
            showValue(i);
    }

    std::map<int, float> map1;
    std::map<int, std::string> map2;
};

class B : public A {
public:
    virtual void showValue(int key) {
        if (map3.count(key))
            std::cout << map3[key];
        else
            A::showValue(key);
    }

    std::map<int, int> map3;
};
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you ! This looks like a much better way of doing it. Hope I can adapt it to my design –  user1233963 Dec 12 '12 at 17:31

What is happening is that when you print 15, you throw i. This is not caught, and escapes up to:

   catch(int i)
    {
        try
        {
            std::cout<<test3.at(i)<<"\n";
        }
        catch(const std::out_of_range&)
        {
            k = i;
            goto label;
        }
    }

The number is correctly printed there, but won't restart. Without knowing more specifics, figuring out how to fix it is virtually impossible...

A much better solution would look something like this:

for (int i=0;i<=7;i++)
{
    if (test.find(i)!=std::map::end)
      std::cout<<test.at(i)<<"\n";
    else if (test2.find(i)!=std::map::end)
      std::cout<<test2.at(i)<<"\n";
    else if (test3.find(i)!=std::map::end)
      std::cout<<test3.at(i)<<"\n";
    else
      std::count<<"Nothing Found"<<std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for pointing out where the problem is although adding that goto creates an infinite loop. –  user1233963 Dec 12 '12 at 17:12
    
See my edit, I think what you are really looking for it something close to what I've posted. –  PearsonArtPhoto Dec 12 '12 at 17:23

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