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I'm not entirely sure why this is happening, but I seem to be getting some regular server-side error reports regarding IE8 requests for CSS font-face fonts. The paths in the CSS are properly relative, and I don't see any errors from IE9.

Here's an example error message as logged (some information obscured).

{
  "DateTimeUTC": "2012-12-10T15:58:32.2512016+00:00",
  "RequestId": "goq9",
  "UserIP": "72.221.104.224",
  "UserAgent": "Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; AOL 9.6; AOLBuild 4340.5004; Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; Trident/4.0; SLCC2; .NET CLR 2.0.50727; .NET CLR 3.5.30729; .NET CLR 3.0.30729; Media Center PC 6.0; MDDS; .NET4.0C; Zune 4.7)",
  "ReferringUrl": "https://some-site/some/path/option1/option2",
  "Message": {
    "Exception": null,
    "RequestId": null,
    "ErrorCode": 404,
    "ErrorDescription": "Not Found",
    "OriginalUrl": "/some/path/fonts/rokkitt/rokkitt-webfont.eot"
  },
  "Exception": null,
  "RequestUrl": "https://some-site.com/some/path/fonts/rokkitt/rokkitt-webfont.eot",
  "Cookies": [/*removed from display*/],
  "PostData": {},
  "DebugInfo": null
}

As you can see, it looks like the request is for a font with the path relative to the page's url, not the css file's url. (/content/css/site/site.css with fonts in /content/fonts/...) Does IE8 just happen to check relative to the page? Or does it check against both?

I'm seeing similar issues, all seem to be IE8, but unable to re-create the issue myself. It does appear to be an AOL backed IE8, not sure if that makes a difference.

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I've been considering moving my fonts to the same cdn being used for images... but was curious if anyone else was having similar issues, why, and how they were resolved? (short of ignoring 404 errors with fonts and IE8) –  Tracker1 Dec 12 '12 at 17:07
2  
What's the path in your stylesheet? –  Billy Moat Dec 12 '12 at 17:18
    
../../fonts/xxx it works fine for other browsers. –  Tracker1 Dec 12 '12 at 21:17
    
I know you've said it works fine in other browsers but would "../../fonts/xxx" not just take you up into your CSS directory and not into your CONTENT directory where it should take you to allow access to the FONTS directory? –  Billy Moat Dec 13 '12 at 9:56
    
css path is... /content/css/site/site.css ... font path is /content/fonts/NAME/font-file.ext ... path is referencing with ../../fonts/NAME/font-file.ext in the css... how it is behaving is as though it's going from the page's path, not the css file's path. –  Tracker1 Dec 17 '12 at 2:26
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1 Answer

I had the same problem, and I think it was caused by embedded stylesheets (i.e. rules in a STYLE element in the HEAD of the HTML). I saw 404's from IE8 in my error logs looking for .eot files in odd paths. The .eot file was referenced in my external stylesheet with a relative path. Browsers that resolved this path relative to the stylesheet URL found the font files, but it seemed IE8 occasionally resolved the path relative to the document URL. I wasn't able to reproduce this with my instance of IE8, but the logs told a pretty clear tale.

We had recently changed our application to use a small embedded stylesheet (i.e. a STYLE element in the HEAD) that included some font-related rules, and the 404's started appearing after this. I removed this embedded stylesheet, and moved the rules to the external stylesheet. I haven't seen any 404's since making this change.

EDIT This answer is incorrect. Moving the rules from the embedded stylesheet to the external stylesheet didn't change the behavior. I made the change on a Friday afternoon, and didn't see any 404's over the weekend, but do see 404's for the .eot files today (Monday).

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