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If I do this in PHP 5.x (generally pseudo-code):

class object{
    __construct($id){
       <<perform database query>>
    }
}

$array(1) = new object(1);
$array(1) = new object(1);

Am I wasting efforts (memory, cpu, etc)? Will the database query run twice?

What is the best way to avoid this (if it's a concern)? Using $array(1) instanceof object? isset($array(1))? array_key_exists(1, $array)?

Is there a (good?) way to check in the class to see if it already exists before it does all the work again?


EDIT: For clarity, I do not need this object twice. And this object will be used again $array(523) = new object(523); My main question is how best to avoid redundantly creating the exact same object.

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re your last sentence, read up the singleton pattern – Prisoner Dec 12 '12 at 17:14
5  
Don't do database operations in __construct() – vodich Dec 12 '12 at 17:14
2  
What @vodich said. And don't read up on the singleton anti-pattern. Maintaining a single DB connection is good. Using a Singleton for that purpose, however, should be avoided. – rdlowrey Dec 12 '12 at 17:17
    
I'm confused here. Do you need two different objects or not? – raina77ow Dec 12 '12 at 17:18
2  
Create a Factory with a cache, which returns existing objects and only creates them when not instantiated. – Wrikken Dec 12 '12 at 17:29
up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you want to avoid creating multiple objects, you have a few choices. The ones that come to mind are...

  1. Create the object once and ensure it's passed to where it's needed. This means you'll have to check the dependencies in your code with respect to that object.

  2. Use an object factory to construct the object and it can return a reference to the object rather than creating a new one, if it was already created.

  3. Implement the singleton pattern.

As with everything else, trade-offs obtain, so check your situation and decide what is the most appropriate for you.

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