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I just came home from a job interview, and the interviewer asked me to write a program:

It should, count from 1 to 100, and print...

If it was multiple of 3, "ping"
If it was multiple of 5, "pong"
Else, print the number.

If it was multiple of 3 AND 5 (like 15), it should print "ping" and "pong".

I chose Javascript, and came up with this:

for (x=1; x <= 100; x++){
    if( x % 3 == 0 ){
        write("ping")
    }
    if( x % 5 == 0 ){
        write("pong")
    }
    if( ( x % 3 != 0 ) && ( x % 5 != 0 ) ){
        write(x)
    }
}

Actualy, I left very unhappy with my solution, but I can't figure out a better one.

Does anyone knows a better way to do that? It's checking twice, I didn't like it. I ran some tests here at home, without success, this is the only one that returns the correct answer...

share|improve this question
1  
If you don't want to check it twice use else if instead. –  Ricardo Alvaro Lohmann Dec 12 '12 at 17:39
    
else if where? I tried didn't work correctly –  BernaMariano Dec 12 '12 at 17:40
7  
This is the classic FizzBuzz programming question, designed to weed out programmers who can't program: codinghorror.com/blog/2007/02/why-cant-programmers-program.html –  Judah Himango Dec 12 '12 at 17:41
    
No need to be unhappy, I think you passed. The object of this test isn't to be elegant, the object is to get working code. –  Mark Ransom Dec 12 '12 at 17:46

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Your solution is quite satisfactory IMHO. Tough, as half numbers are not multiple of 3 nor 5, I'd start the other way around:

for (var x=1; x <= 100; x++){
    if( x % 3 && x % 5 ) {
        document.write(x);
    } else {
        if( x % 3 == 0 ) {
            document.write("ping");
        }
        if( x % 5 == 0 ) {
            document.write("pong");
        }
    }
    document.write('<br>'); //line breaks to enhance output readability
}​

Fiddle

Also, note that any number other than 0 and NaN are truthy values, so I've removed the unnecessary != 0 and some pairs of parenthesis.


Here's another version, it doesn't make the same modulus operation twice but needs to store a variable:

for (var x=1; x <= 100; x++) {
    var skip = 0;
    if (x % 3 == 0) {
        document.write('ping');
        skip = 1;
    }
    if (x % 5 == 0) {
        document.write('pong');
        skip = 1;
    }
    if (!skip) {
        document.write(x);
    }
    document.write('<br>'); //line breaks to enhance output readability
}

Fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
Not that different from mine, but still better, as I asked for. Thanks –  BernaMariano Dec 12 '12 at 17:58
    
Yes, I've thought about it in many ways but all the simple logic ones require 2 checks. I've only added an else micro-optimization, as I said, your code is pretty satisfactory IMO. Sec I'll attempt to redo it in a single line of code, but that'd probably get you reproved. =] –  Fabrício Matté Dec 12 '12 at 18:01
    
@BernaMariano updated answer, now it doesn't make the same calc twice, however it requires a variable. –  Fabrício Matté Dec 12 '12 at 18:15
1  
This is one line ;) : for (var x=1, skip; x <= 100; x++, skip=0) ((x % 3 || document.write('ping') || (skip=1)) && (x % 5 || document.write('pong') || (skip=1)) && skip || document.write(x)) + document.write('<br>'); –  Shmiddty Dec 12 '12 at 18:43
    
@Shmiddty Yup, that <br> really helps to read the output. I kept it separated from the main logic as the question didn't ask to print new lines. Adding the <br> makes it much more readable though. =] –  Fabrício Matté Dec 12 '12 at 18:45

Here's my one-liner:

for(var x=1;x<101;x++)document.write((((x%3?'':'ping')+(x%5?'':'pong'))||x)+'<br>');

​ I'm using ternary operators to return either an empty string or 'ping'/'pong', concatenating the result of these operators, then doing an OR (if the number is neither divisible by 3 or 5, the result of the concatenation is '' which is FALSEY in javascript). When both cases are true, the result of the concatenation is 'pingpong'.

So basically it comes down to

'' || x         // returns x
'ping' || x     // returns 'ping'
'pong' || x     // returns 'pong'
'pingpong' || x // returns 'pingpong'
share|improve this answer
    
+1, may not the most practical, but beats all and any JS minifier. =] –  Fabrício Matté Dec 12 '12 at 22:56
    
Good one, but I think you would NEVER think of this standing in front of a board, with a pen and 5 senior developers waiting for your solution... –  BernaMariano Dec 13 '12 at 1:46

I wrote a few variations on this (using fizz and buzz) as a benchmark to consider different ways of iterating over conditional logic.

while won again:

// Iterate using a recursive function
// firing a callback once per iteration

function f(s,n) {
    if(++n >= 102) return;
    s === '' ? console.log(n-1) : console.log(s);
    !!(n % 3)
        ? !!(n % 5)
            ? f('',n) : f('Buzz',n)
        : !!(n % 5)
            ? f('Fizz',n) : f('FizzBuzz',n);
}

// Iterate using a `while` loop
// firing a callback after satisfying a condition

function b(n) {
    var i = n;
    $:
        while(++i) {
            if(i % 3)
                if(i % 5) 
                    console.log(i);
                else 
                    console.log('Buzz');
            else if(i % 5) 
                console.log('Fizz');
            else 
                console.log('FizzBuzz');
            if(i >= 100) 
                break $;
        }
    return;
}

// Iterate using a `for` loop
// firing a callback once per iteration

function F(n) {
    var i = n, f = 'Fizz', b = 'Buzz', o = '';
    for (; i <= 100; i++) { 
        o = !(i % 3) 
            ? !(i % 5) 
                ? f + b : f 
            : !(i % 5) 
                ? b : i; 
        console.log(o);
    }
    return;
}

// Iterate using a `for` loop
// firing a callback after satisfying a condition

function B(n) {
    var i = n;
    var fiz = 'Fizz';
    var buz = 'Buzz';
    for(; i <= 100; i++)
        if(!(i % 3))
            if(!(i % 5))
                console.log(fiz + buz);
            else
                console.log(fiz);
        else if(!(i % 5))
            console.log(buz);
        else
            console.log(i);
    return;     
}


f('', 1); // recursive
b(0);     // `while`
F(1);     // `for`
B(1);     // `for

Benchmark: http://jsperf.com/fizzbuzz-mod

share|improve this answer
    
Update: After more tests on different browsers, the third method is starting to pull away from the others in terms of operations-per-second. The outlying difference being that it 'deduces' first by running through all logic, and then firing a single callback. Interesting to note. What I'd be interested in seeing (if someone is up for it), is an example using inverse loops (e.g. while(i--)) to see if it's any more performant. –  benny Mar 3 '13 at 20:54

To get rid of the last condition you might use continue:

for (x=1; x <= 100; x++){

    if( x % 3 == 0 ){
        write("ping")
        continue
    }
    if( x % 5 == 0 ){
        write("pong")
        continue
    }

    write(x)
}
share|improve this answer
 for( int number = 1 ; number < 100 ; number++ )
    {
        boolean shouldPrintNumber = true;

        System.out.println("\n");
        if( (number%3) == 0 )
        {
            System.out.print("ping");
            shouldPrintNumber = false;
        }
        if( (number%5) == 0 )
        {
            System.out.print("pong");
            shouldPrintNumber = false;
        }

        if( shouldPrintNumber )
        {
            System.out.print( number );
        }

    }
share|improve this answer

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