Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a way to avoid the unchecked class cast in this hierarchical Builder pattern?

public abstract class BaseBuilder <T, B extends BaseBuilder<T,B>> {

  public B setB1(String b1) {
    this.b1 = b1;
    return (B) this; // can I make this unchecked cast go away?
  }

  abstract public T build();

  String b1;
}

and no, the answer is not:

return B.class.cast(this);

and yes, I know I could use @SuppressWarnings

share|improve this question
4  
Unfortunately, Java doesn't allow for enforcing B to be the "current" class, and the unchecked warning is there to remind you that. class MBB1<String, MBB2>, class MBB2<String, MBB2>, what do you expect MBB1.setB1() to do? –  ignis Dec 12 '12 at 18:05
1  
related: stackoverflow.com/questions/7354740/… –  Paul Bellora Dec 12 '12 at 22:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As said before, this can't be done, because it is not safe. B extends BaseBuilder<T,B>, but BaseBuilder<T,B> (type of this) does not extend B. Recursive bounds are almost NEVER useful in Java, and do not give you the self-type. You should get rid of it.

You can add an abstract method such that implementing classes must give an instance of B:

public abstract class BaseBuilder <T, B> {

  abstract public B getB();

  public B setB1(String b1) {
    this.b1 = b1;
    return getB();
  }

  abstract public T build();

  String b1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I hadn't thought of the shenanigans like: public class EvilBuilder extends BaseBuilder<Thing1, Thing1Builder> {... –  Eric Dec 13 '12 at 0:09

besides of what louis said the following is a somewhat nice design:

public abstract class BaseBuilder ... {
    ...
    public B setB1(String b1) {
        this.b1 = b1;
        return self();
    }

    abstract protected B self();
    ...
}

public class SomeBuilder extends BaseBuilder ... {
    @override
    protected SomeBuilder self() {
        return this;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Yes; return BaseBuilder<T, B> and force subclasses to override setB1 to return themselves.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the simple yet correct approach –  Julien May Dec 12 '12 at 18:12
1  
And how to force them? –  Saintali Dec 12 '12 at 21:35
1  
@Saintali: they don't have to return themselves. They just have to return an instance of B. So all you need is to have a return type of B. –  newacct Dec 12 '12 at 22:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.