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Write1 [1.0]
Write1 [12.0]
Write1 ['C:/Users/san/Modeler/']
Write1 ['png']
Write1 ['rgb']
Write1 [True]
Write2 [1.0]
Write2 [1.0]
Write2 ['']
Write2 [' ']
Write2 ['rgb']
Write2 [False]

I want to make dictioary like this {'Write1':[1.0,12.0,'c:/path','png','rgb',True],'Write2':[1.0,1.0,'',' ','rgb',False]} the values inside the list comes from nuke.toNode(wNode)[eachAttrib].value() this is what i tried to do

attributes=[]
wnodeData={}
for wNode in writeNodes:
    for eachAttrib in ['first','last','file','file_type','channels','use_limit']:
        wnodeData[wNode]=attributes
        attributes.append(nuke.toNode(wNode)[eachAttrib].value())
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closed as not a real question by Lev Levitsky, natan, Anup Cowkur, Deefour, valex Dec 18 '12 at 5:45

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Are you asking how to read the above code block as a string or text file, and output the corresponding dictionary? –  abarnert Dec 12 '12 at 18:03

4 Answers 4

Something like:

text="""Write1 [1.0]
Write1 [12.0]
Write1 ['C:/Users/san/Modeler/']
Write1 ['png']
Write1 ['rgb']
Write1 [True]
Write2 [1.0]
Write2 [1.0]
Write2 ['']
Write2 [' ']
Write2 ['rgb']
Write2 [False]"""

from ast import literal_eval

d = {}
lines = text.splitlines()
for line in lines:
    k, v = line.split(' ', 1)
    val = literal_eval(v)[0]
    d.setdefault(k, []).append(val)

print d

# {'Write1': [1.0, 12.0, 'C:/Users/san/Modeler/', 'png', 'rgb', True], 'Write2': [1.0, 1.0, '', ' ', 'rgb', False]}
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import collections

s = '''Write1 [1.0]
Write1 [12.0]
Write1 ['C:/Users/san/Modeler/']
Write1 ['png']
Write1 ['rgb']
Write1 [True]
Write2 [1.0]
Write2 [1.0]
Write2 ['']
Write2 [' ']
Write2 ['rgb']
Write2 [False]'''

d = collections.defaultdict(list)
for line in s.split('\n'):
    print(line)
    key, val = line.split(' ', 1)
    d[key].append(val[1:-1])
print(d)

Obviously, if you've got a text file instead of a string, you'd replace the for loop with, say:

with open('mystuff.txt', 'r') as f:
    for line in f:

If you want to actually evaluate the values inside the brackets (so you get a float for the 1.0 instead of the string '1.0', the string 'png' instead of the string "'png'", etc.), you need to know the language they're written in and parse that. It looks like they're a subset of Python, where each thing is either a single-quoted string literal with no escapes, a float literal in non-exponential format, or a boolean literal, but I wouldn't just assume that without knowing where the values come from (and I certainly wouldn't just call eval on them without knowing where they come from, because then someone could just stick os.system('rm -rf /') in the text file, and you'd evaluate that.

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make a defaultdict with the default value as a list and then start appending (or using other list methods).

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write1 = {'write1':[1,2,3,4] }

should work ...

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