Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Apart from this code being horrible inefficient, is this way I´m writing recursive function here considered "good style". Like for example what I am doing creating a wrapper then passing it the int mid and a counter int count.

What this code does is getting values from the array then see if that combined with blockIndex is greater than the mid. So, appart from being inefficient would I get a job writing recursive functions like this?

int NumCriticalVotes :: CountCriticalVotesWrapper(Vector<int> & blocks, int blockIndex)
{

    int indexValue = blocks.get(blockIndex);
    blocks.remove(blockIndex);
    int mid = 9;

    return CountCriticalVotes(blocks, indexValue, mid, 0);
}


int NumCriticalVotes :: CountCriticalVotes(Vector<int> & blocks, int blockIndex, int mid, int counter)
{
    if (blocks.isEmpty())
    {
        return counter;
    }

    if (blockIndex + blocks.get(0) >= mid)
    {
        counter += 1;
    } 

    Vector<int> rest = blocks;
    rest.remove(0);
    return CountCriticalVotes(rest, blockIndex, mid, counter);
}
share|improve this question
    
What part of the code are you unsure about? – user334856 Dec 12 '12 at 18:48
    
The whole code really, I am new to writing recursive functions and I am teaching myself programming so I wanted some feedback if this is valid way of doing it, even thought I know it works. – Tom Lilletveit Dec 12 '12 at 18:49
    
@TomLilletveit Why are you returning counter? and what is your stop condition for this recursion method? – Smit Dec 12 '12 at 18:54
    
@smit: The stop Condition is if the (blocks) array is empty, and I am returning the counter cause it contains the number of times a value from the array combined with 'blockIndex' is greater than the 'mid' – Tom Lilletveit Dec 12 '12 at 19:00
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is valid to the extent that it'll work for sufficiently small collections.

It is, however, quite inefficient -- for each recursive call you're creating a copy of the entire uncounted part of the Vector. So, if you count a vector containing, say, 1000 items, you'll first create a Vector of 999 items, then another of 998 items, then another of 997, and so on, all the way down to 0 items.

This would be pretty wasteful by itself, but seems to even get worse. You're then removing an item from your Vector -- but you're removing the first item. Assuming your Vector is something like std::vector, removing the last item takes constant time but removing the first item takes linear time -- i.e., to remove he first item, each item after that is shifted "forward" into the vacated spot.

This means that instead of taking constant space and linear time, your algorithm is quadratic in both space and time. Unless the collection involved is extremely small, it's going to be quite wasteful.

Instead of creating an entire new Vector for each call, I'd just pass around offsets into the existing Vector. This will avoid both copying and removing items, so it's pretty trivial to make it linear in both time and space (which is still well short of optimum, but at least not nearly as bad as quadratic).

To reduce the space used still further, treat the array as two halves. Count each half separately, then add together the results. This will reduce recursion depth to logarithmic instead of linear, which is generally quite substantial (e.g., for a 1000 items, it's a depth of about 10 instead of about a 1000. For a million items, the depth goes up to about 20 instead of a million).

share|improve this answer

Without know exactly what you are trying to accomplish, this is a very tough question to answer. The way I see recursion, or coding in general, is does it satisfy the following three requirements.

  1. Does it accomplish all desired functionality?
  2. Is it error resilient? Meaning it will not break when passed invalid inputs, or edge cases.
  3. Does it accomplish its goal in sufficient time?

I think you are worried about number 3, and I can say that the time should fit the problem. For example, if you searching through 2 huge lists, O(n^2) is probably not acceptable. However, say you are searching through 2 small sets O(n^2) is probably sufficiently fast.

What I can say is to try timing different implementations of your algorithm on test cases. Just because your solution is recursive doesn't mean that it will always be faster than a "brute force" implementation. (This of course depends specifically on the case).

To answer your question, as far as recursion goes, this sample looks fine. However, will you get a job writing code like this? I don't know how well does this satisfy the other two coding requirements?

share|improve this answer

Very subjective question. The tail recursion is nice (in my book) but I'd balance that against creating a new vector on every call, which makes a linear algorithm quadratic. Independent of recursion, that's a big no-no, particularly as it is easily avoidable.

A few comments about what the code is intended to accomplish would also be helpful, although I suppose in context that would be less problematic.

share|improve this answer

The issues with your solution is your passing the count around. Stop pass the count and use the stack to keep track of it. The other issue is I'm not sure what your second condition is suppose to do.

int NumCriticalVotes :: CountCriticalVotesWrapper(Vector<int> & blocks, int blockIndex)
{

    int indexValue = blocks.get(blockIndex);
    blocks.remove(blockIndex);
    int mid = 9;

    return CountCriticalVotes(blocks, indexValue, mid);
}


int NumCriticalVotes :: CountCriticalVotes(Vector<int> & blocks, int blockIndex, int mid)
{
    if (blocks.isEmpty())
    {
        return 0;
    }

    if (/*Not sure what the condition is*/) 
    {
        return 1 + CountCriticalVotes(blocks, blockIndex, mid);
    }

    return CountCriticalVotes(blocks, blockIndex, mid);
}
share|improve this answer
    
if I use "return 1 +" then it will add 1 to each stack frame and won´t satisfy the condition to when and not it should return 1. Which only is if the value at pos[0] in array is greater than the 'mid' that I passed as parameter. – Tom Lilletveit Dec 12 '12 at 19:09
    
@TomLilletveit I'm still not clear what the condition is. The coding does not make it clear, I updated the answer. – andre Dec 12 '12 at 19:13
    
haha... the more I delve into programming the more I seem to loose of the people´s skill of communicating ideas. – Tom Lilletveit Dec 12 '12 at 19:16

In C++, traversing lists of arbitrary length using recursion is never a good practice. It's not just about performance. The standard doesn't mandate tail call optimization, so you have a risk of stack overflow if you can't guarantee that the list has some limited size.

Sure, the recursion depth has to be several hundred thousand with typical stack sizes, but it's hard to know when designing a program what kind of inputs it must be able to handle in the future. The problem might come back to haunt you much later.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.