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I am trying to do this using Mockito on a Mock:
When Mock.someMethod(..) is called with argument1 --> return result1
When Mock.someMethod(..) is called with argument2 --> return result2
When Mock.someMethod(..) is called with argument3 --> return result3

    when(mock.method(Matchers.argThat(new MyMatcher1() {

        @Override
        public boolean matches(Object arg0) {
                   // comparision logic
        }
    }))).thenReturn(result1);

    when(mock.method(Matchers.argThat(new MyMatcher2() {

        @Override
        public boolean matches(Object arg0) {
                   // comparision logic
        }
    }))).thenReturn(result2);

    when(mock.method(Matchers.argThat(new MyMatcher3() {

        @Override
        public boolean matches(Object arg0) {
                   // comparision logic
        }
    }))).thenReturn(result3);

But Mockito stubs the first one correctly, but on the second one it throws NullPointer exception as it for some reason tries to run the Matcher with null agrument. I am not sure if it is supported.

If this is not the correct way, how to achieve this with Mockito? Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Got it, I always clicked on those arrows to say that it was useful, which I thought gives credit to the people answering. May be not, I will check it out. Thanks. Regarding the link though, it is a boolean Matcher, but the ArgumentMatcher I created also is a Boolean matcher, I don't think mine is anyway different from this one, but will try let you know. –  endless Dec 12 '12 at 19:41
1  
The link is not very good :) See argThat javadoc on that page. It does say about NPE. –  Andrew Logvinov Dec 12 '12 at 19:43

3 Answers 3

As a rule of thumb, if a test fails, you should be able to pinpoint what is wrong with the unit under test. Avoid writing custom matchers specifically for one test. If a method needs to return more than one value, it is usually sufficient to simply stub the method by returning the values in the order the test predicts.

e.g.

when(mock.method(any(Object.class))).thenReturn(result1, result2, result3);

This will return result 1 one the first invocation, result2 on the second and so on.

There are obviously scenarios where this is insufficient, but more often than not, the simpler test is the better one.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion. But certainly my usecase is a bit different as I mentioned in the initial question. I want result1 only if input is input1, result2 if input2 etc.. it can be in any order. Multiple argument matchers should work based on the way they are designed, but it feels more like a bug in Mockito. I was able to get around the problem, but putting a null check on "arg0" in the custom argument matcher. Silly, but works. May be I will take it up with Mockito team. –  endless Dec 12 '12 at 22:25

Instead of writing

when(mock.method(Matchers.argThat(new MyMatcher1() {
    @Override
    public boolean matches(Object arg0) {
           // comparison logic
    }
}))).thenReturn(result1);

Try this.

doReturn(result1).when(mock).method(Matchers.argThat(new MyMatcher1() {

    @Override
    public boolean matches(Object arg0) {
               // comparison logic
    }
}));

and similarly for result2 and result3.

This is described at http://docs.mockito.googlecode.com/hg/latest/org/mockito/Mockito.html#12, but in my opinion, the documentation is unclear about the fact that this construction is actually needed in this case. I will talk to the rest of the Mockito team about improving the documentation here.

Good luck.

share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I was able to get around the problem for now, by having a null check in the custom ArgumentMatcher. It worked, as the NPE is only during startup when Mockito is calling when() statements. It shouldn't even call ArgumentMatcher.matches() at this time! It feels like a bug in Mockito.

share|improve this answer
1  
Unlike EasyMock, Mockito doesn't have a difference between "set-up" and "replay" modes. So when your code says when(mock.foo(123)).thenReturn(456); it first evaluates mock.foo(123) as if you were calling it from your system under test--which means it checks its arguments to find out what to return before it ever encounters the when. See David's excellent answer for the alternative syntax that avoids this problem. Remember, Matchers should never throw Exceptions, even NPEs; consider Hamcrest's TypeSafeMatcher to save yourself a check and a cast. –  Jeff Bowman Dec 13 '12 at 5:07

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