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Please take a look at the following code:

http://jsfiddle.net/htdTg/2/

In the first link there is a title attribute containing the html special character &lt; followed by "!" (it doesn't matter which character it is followed by actually). When we take the value of that title attribute with jQuery's attr() function the html is broken (you can see that there is no "<" character printed as long as the following text is also missing.

In the second link the only difference is that I have added a space after &lt; and now it works as expected.

Do you think it's a bug in jQuery or I just don't understand something?

PS. If you think I'm doing something strange - it's just some piece of code from some tooltip plugin.

HTML:

<a href="#" title="<div style='color:red'>This is the less than sign: &lt;! Now you know it?</div>">This is a link</a><br>
<a href="#" title="<div style='color:red'>This is the less than sign: &lt; ! Now you know it?</div>">This is a link</a><br>​

jQuery:

$('a').each(function() {
    $('body').append($(this).attr('title')); });

// just to exclude that it's append() function's fault :)
$('body').append("<div style='color:red'>This is the less than sign: &lt;! Now you know it?</div>");​
share|improve this question
6  
Is it valid to include HTML code in attributes? –  Blender Dec 12 '12 at 19:54
1  
I added your code from jsFiddle. Questions and Answers on SO should be fully "self-contained". –  Sparky Dec 12 '12 at 19:54
    
The title should not contain any HTML. Some people actually do hover the links, and see the code. –  Jan Dvorak Dec 12 '12 at 19:56
    
Did you see the W3C standard? See my answer stackoverflow.com/a/13847609/376535 –  shiplu.mokadd.im Dec 12 '12 at 20:30
1  
@ErikE: It's valid to include escaped code in attributes. –  Blender Dec 12 '12 at 22:41
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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is pretty interesting. I looked up what text can be in a title attribute and the reference says:

User agents should interpret attribute values as follows:

  1. Replace character entities with characters,
  2. Ignore line feeds,
  3. Replace each carriage return or tab with a single space.

Apparently, this is the expected behavior. &lt; is being parsed as < by the browser, which might be interpreted as HTML by jQuery.

You should be escape the ampersand as well:

&amp;lt;

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/htdTg/9/

Even better demo: http://jsfiddle.net/PsZeY/6/

share|improve this answer
    
If you're supposed to escape ampersands that are part of a valid character entity encoding, then how can you put an ampersand in there as part of a character entity encoding? –  ErikE Dec 12 '12 at 20:08
1  
@ErikE: &amp;amp;? –  Blender Dec 12 '12 at 20:13
    
But then you have an unescaped ampersand in there. So you should do &amp;amp;amp;lt;. But, still unescaped! So &amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;. Wait--&amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;. No, &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;lt;. AUUUGH! The question is WHY the double escaping? If the rule is, as you say, Replace character entities with characters then how is &lt; not doing the job? It's been escaped. –  ErikE Dec 12 '12 at 22:05
1  
@ErikE: Care to explain how? I've never had to put HTML into tooltips so I don't know why you would need to do this, but there isn't anything inherently wrong with doing it. –  Blender Dec 12 '12 at 22:25
1  
@ErikE: That's not the point of the question. The question is about why the attribute's value changes as it passes from the parser to your script or stylesheet. Even if you were doing this "correctly", the same problems arise: jsfiddle.net/htdTg/13 –  Blender Dec 12 '12 at 22:37
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Why its happening?

This is happening because &lt;! Now you know it? </div> is converted to <! Now you know it? </div-->

According to HTML standard <! and > is the start and end of comment structure. Note this is comment structure not comment. Hence browwer converts the rest as comment unless it gets a end delimiter >.

From W3C

<!-- this is a comment -->
<!-- and so is this one,
    which occupies more than one line -->

White space is not permitted between the markup declaration open delimiter(<!) and the comment open delimiter (--), but is permitted between the comment close delimiter (--) and the markup declaration close delimiter (">"). A common error is to include a string of hyphens (---) within a comment. Authors should avoid putting two or more adjacent hyphens inside comments.

Also in here

The syntax for comment declarations in SGML is

 comment declaration =
    MDO ("<!"), (comment, ( s | comment )* )?, MDC (">")
 comment =
    COM ("--"), SGML character*, COM ("--")

How to solve it?

You already know it. use &amp; to replace &. So write &amp;lt;! instead of &lt;!. This will make &lt; appended to body element instead of <! which is comment structure opening.

share|improve this answer
    
The question is not how to make it work, it's why in this current shape and form it does not. –  KingKongFrog Dec 12 '12 at 20:00
    
@KingKongFrog added the Why –  shiplu.mokadd.im Dec 12 '12 at 20:25
    
You still didn't answer the ultimate why--you answered the proximate why of the <! starting an HTML comment. But why would an attribute need to be double-encoded? It's only because the OP is cramming HTML into a place it doesn't belong. –  ErikE Dec 12 '12 at 22:36
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In this case...

title="<div style='color:red'>This is the less than sign: &lt;! Now you know it?</div>"

&lt;! is converted to <! which is the start of a HTML comment and exactly why it does not render in the browser window.

For all cases, you should not have HTML entities contained within an attribute. Use this instead...

title="&lt;div style='color:red'&gt;This is the less than sign: &amp;lt;! Now you know it?&lt;/div&gt;"

http://jsfiddle.net/htdTg/5/

If you want to preserve the HTML entities, use &lt;div&gt; to be processed as <div>. Alternatively, &amp;lt;div&amp;gt; will actually render <div> in the browser window.

See: http://jsfiddle.net/htdTg/8/

So if you want the browser to actually display a <!, then use this: &amp;lt!

share|improve this answer
    
So, just to be safe, if encoding attributes programmatically, shouldn't all the &lt; characters be &amp;lt;? It is sneakily nasty that a character following an entity can determine how that entity is represented. –  ErikE Dec 12 '12 at 20:07
    
@ErikE, that depends on what you're trying to do. See the difference here: jsfiddle.net/htdTg/8 –  Sparky Dec 12 '12 at 20:08
    
You answered the question but didn't address the more important issue that the OP shouldn't be doing that. –  ErikE Dec 12 '12 at 22:35
    
@ErikE, huh? Maybe you missed this line? "For all cases, you should not have HTML entities contained within an attribute" –  Sparky Dec 12 '12 at 22:55
    
It was not "how to escape entities" that concerned me but "putting HTML in title attributes at all, escaped or not". –  ErikE Dec 12 '12 at 23:39
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The text isn't missing the problem is that it get commented because &lt;! is the same of <! which is being translated to <!--(don't know why) which starts a comment in html.

If you inspect your html you'll see the following.

<div style='color:red'>This is the less than sign: <!-- Now you know it? --></div>
<div style='color:red'>This is the less than sign: < ! Now you know it?</div> 

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So, why down vote ? Any suggestion ? –  Ricardo Alvaro Lohmann Dec 12 '12 at 23:00
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I'm not sure if you're just asking the question or actually looking for a solution to the problem. If the latter, then strangely this seems to work fine: &amp;lt;

Updated code:

HTML:

<a href="#" title="<div style='color:red'>This is the less than sign: &amp;lt;! Now you know it?</div>">This is a link</a><br>
<a href="#" title="<div style='color:red'>This is the less than sign: &amp;lt; ! Now you know it?</div>">This is a link</a><br>​

jQuery:

$('a').each(function() {
    $('body').append($(this).attr('title')); });

// just to exclude that it's append() function's fault :)
$('body').append("<div style='color:red'>This is the less than sign: &lt;! Now you know it?</div>");​

Updated fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/htdTg/3/

share|improve this answer
    
Then it looks like a bug in jQuery to me. Try filing it and link to the question, please. I want to see the official response. –  Jan Dvorak Dec 12 '12 at 19:57
    
@JanDvorak, you can always go and ask yourself in the IRC channel ;) –  Alexander Dec 12 '12 at 20:01
    
There's no jQuery bug. It's using text as HTML that is the problem. –  ErikE Dec 12 '12 at 23:43
add comment

Nothing is really wrong..

The issue is that html inside attributes must be encoded. You already have encoded the < as &lt; and that means that it will be read as <.

So .attr() will return a pure < character and not the encoded..

The reason it does not show is with .append which will try to parse the html if it thinks there is html in it.. It finds the <! text and it considers it as html comment. actually this is done directly by the browser.


If you look at

var e = document.createElement('div');
e.innerHTML = '<!';
console.log(e.innerHTML);

you will see that the inner HTML of the div after setting it to <! is <!---->.

So that is how the browsers interpret this code.. it has nothing to do with jQuery..

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for append information. I investigated and it realy happen on append. –  Ricardo Alvaro Lohmann Dec 12 '12 at 23:52
    
Do you know why <! is considered as start of a comment ? –  Ricardo Alvaro Lohmann Dec 12 '12 at 23:52
    
@RicardoLohmann because html comments start with <!-- and end with -->. Browsers will translate <! to comment.. updated answer to show example –  Gaby aka G. Petrioli Dec 13 '12 at 0:50
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