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I have the following lines in my code:

    if (command.equals("sort") && args.length == 2) {
    //run some program
    }

Someone suggests that I should use two separate if statements because there's no need to evaluate any of the other if statements if the command does not equal to "sort"​, regardless of whether or not the args length is correct.

So according to that that, I need to rewrite my code to:

if (command.equals("sort")) {
  if (args.length == 2) {
    //run some program
  }
}

I know they both do the job, but my question is which one is better and more efficient?

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1  
"Someone" needs to read up on java's short-circuiting logic operators. –  GriffeyDog Dec 12 '12 at 22:00

9 Answers 9

up vote 14 down vote accepted

No, that's not true. They call it short circuit, if the first condition evaluates as false, the second one would not be evaluated at all.

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Does it compiled in to the same byte-code? In other words, what is the most efficient way to do it? –  Kirill Kulakov Dec 12 '12 at 20:39
2  
Use the AND operator. Because you can read the code easier. This is from WikiPedia: "The difference in terms of computing efficiency between these two cases depends heavily on compiler and optimization scheme used; with proper optimization they will execute at the same speed, as they will get compiled to identical machine code": en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Short-circuit_evaluation –  Roozbeh Dec 12 '12 at 20:49

Well, since && is a short-circuit operator. So both the if statements are effectively the same.

So, in first case, if your command.equals("sort"), returns false, the following condition will not be evaluated at all. So, in my opinion, just go with the first one. It's clearer.

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As stated, short circuit will cause the program to exit the if statement the moment a condition fails, meaning any further conditions will not be evaluated, so there's no real difference in the way the two formats are evaluated.

I would like to note that code legibility is negatively affected when you have several if statements nested within each other, and that to me is the main reason not to nest. For example:

if( conditionA && conditionaB && !conditionC ){
    // Do Something
}

is much cleaner than:

if( conditionA ){
    if( conditionB ){
        if( !conditionC ){
            // Do Something
        }
    }
}

Imagine that with 20 nested if statements? Not a common occurrence, sure, but possible.

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They are the same. For your first example, any modern runtime will ignore the second expression if the first expression is false.

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2  
The Java Language Specification requires the short-circuit behavior. It is not up to the runtime. –  Patricia Shanahan Dec 12 '12 at 20:13
1  
Well, the runtime is the implementation of the specification, right? So we are both right. :) –  Peter Cetinski Dec 12 '12 at 20:15
    
No, because you qualified it with 'any modern'. Any Java implementation whatsoever of any date is obliged to behave as specified. The behaviour actually comes from the compiler, not the JVM. –  EJP Dec 16 '12 at 1:39
    
Actually my comment was not Java specific so "any modern" is generic enough to be applicable. Also, I disagree with your statement that the compiler is at work here because we are testing a variable value that is only available at runtime. –  Peter Cetinski Dec 16 '12 at 1:53

short circuiting is better which is done by && if you are check null case for a value and then apply a function on that object, short circuit operator works well. It stops from condition 2 to be executed if condition 1 is false.

ex:

String s=null;

if(s!=null && s.length())

This doesnt throw exceptions and also in most cases you save one more if check.

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If the conditions are in the same order, they are exactly the same in terms of efficient.

if (command.equals("sort") && args.length == 2)

Will drop out if command.squals("sort") returns false and args.length will never be checked. That's the short-circuit operation of the && operator.

What it comes down to is a matter of style and readability. IMO When you start chaining too many together in a single if statement it can get hard to read.

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Actually, it is called [Lazy_evaluation]: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lazy_evaluation

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Actually it isn't. Lazy evaluation does not appear in Java. The execution of the && operator is completely defined by the language specification and has nothing to do with lazy evaluation. –  EJP Dec 13 '12 at 9:59
    
Actually I was replying to short circuit post and I mean that evaluation inside the if statement condition is lazy evaluated, because parts of condition which are not necessary are not evaluated. I do not tell about exact definition of && :) –  rduga Dec 13 '12 at 12:51
    
@ruga Actually 'lazy evaluation' has a pretty exact definition too, as provided in the article you cited, and it does not occur in Java. –  EJP Dec 16 '12 at 1:37

That's not really the question but note that if you want the two if evaluated, you can use & :

if (methodA() & methodB()) {
    // 
}

instead of

boolean a = methodA();
boolean b = methodB();
if (a && b) {
    //
}
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yeah, their suggestions are completely right. What I suggest you is to write the first check as:

"sort".equals(command)

Maybe it does not make sense in this case but in future. Use the static type first so you never need a null check before

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The suggestion is completely wrong. 'They', and you, need to read the Java Language Specification. –  EJP Dec 13 '12 at 9:58
    
Yeah... with they I meant the other comments :-) –  boskop Dec 13 '12 at 12:34

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