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I use a buffer to receive data from a serial port. The buffer has a fixed length which is 100 and when I receive data I store the length of this data in a variable (index).

I would like to check if the buffer from 0 to index-1 contains a substring.

I've read that I could possibly do it using strstr and strdup but I have two issues with this. First I don't know how to extract a string from buffer and second it would be better if I didn't have to copy the string just to delete it one line later when I look for a substring in it.

My variables are the following:

char output[100];
int index = 0;
char* substring;

And I'd like a function that would return true if substring is in output[0:index] and false otherwise.

Any help or lead would be very appreciated!

Edit: I'm writing a piece of code for an atmel µC so it seems as I'm limited to those functions.

Edit 2: Actually it seems like I can use all the functions from the standard string.h

Edit 3: I checked for sure in my dependencies and under are all the functions I can call.

extern int ffs (int __val) __ATTR_CONST__;
extern int ffsl (long __val) __ATTR_CONST__;
extern int ffsll (long long __val) __ATTR_CONST__;
extern void *memccpy(void *, const void *, int, size_t);
extern void *memchr(const void *, int, size_t) __ATTR_PURE__;
extern int memcmp(const void *, const void *, size_t) __ATTR_PURE__;
extern void *memcpy(void *, const void *, size_t);
extern void *memmem(const void *, size_t, const void *, size_t) __ATTR_PURE__;
extern void *memmove(void *, const void *, size_t);
extern void *memrchr(const void *, int, size_t) __ATTR_PURE__;
extern void *memset(void *, int, size_t);
extern char *strcat(char *, const char *);
extern char *strchr(const char *, int) __ATTR_PURE__;
extern char *strchrnul(const char *, int) __ATTR_PURE__;
extern int strcmp(const char *, const char *) __ATTR_PURE__;
extern char *strcpy(char *, const char *);
extern int strcasecmp(const char *, const char *) __ATTR_PURE__;
extern char *strcasestr(const char *, const char *) __ATTR_PURE__;
extern size_t strcspn(const char *__s, const char *__reject) __ATTR_PURE__;
extern char *strdup(const char *s1);
extern size_t strlcat(char *, const char *, size_t);
extern size_t strlcpy(char *, const char *, size_t);
extern size_t strlen(const char *) __ATTR_PURE__;
extern char *strlwr(char *);
extern char *strncat(char *, const char *, size_t);
extern int strncmp(const char *, const char *, size_t) __ATTR_PURE__;
extern char *strncpy(char *, const char *, size_t);
extern int strncasecmp(const char *, const char *, size_t) __ATTR_PURE__;
extern size_t strnlen(const char *, size_t) __ATTR_PURE__;
extern char *strpbrk(const char *__s, const char *__accept) __ATTR_PURE__;
extern char *strrchr(const char *, int) __ATTR_PURE__;
extern char *strrev(char *);
extern char *strsep(char **, const char *);
extern size_t strspn(const char *__s, const char *__accept) __ATTR_PURE__;
extern char *strstr(const char *, const char *) __ATTR_PURE__;
extern char *strtok(char *, const char *);
extern char *strtok_r(char *, const char *, char **);
extern char *strupr(char *);
share|improve this question
2  
"indices" is the plural of "index" because it's Latin. The singular form is still "index" :) –  user529758 Dec 12 '12 at 20:48
    
@carlosdc I edited the question, the substring is not of length 1. H2CO3 I'm sorry I'm french so sometimes I get mixed up between french and english in my code. –  Leo Dec 12 '12 at 20:51
    
Sounds to me like strnstr is what you want. kernel.org/doc/htmldocs/kernel-api/API-strnstr.html –  Michael Dec 12 '12 at 20:51
    
Are you looking for something like strncmp? It takes two c strings and compares up to N of their characters starting at index 0. –  Ryan Maloney Dec 12 '12 at 20:51
    
strstr() is probably what you want. NB: BSD (?) used to to have index() which returned the numerical position (offset of b into a), but nowadays index() is a synomym for strstr(). –  wildplasser Dec 12 '12 at 20:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

From the link you posted I would go with memmem().

void *memmem(const void *s1, 
             size_t len1, 
             const void *s2, 
             size_t len2);

The memmem() function finds the start of the first occurrence of the substring s2 of length len2 in the memory area s1 of length len1.

share|improve this answer
    
I would you call this function using directly the value of the substring? Is something like ptr = memmem(output, 100, "blabla", 6); correct? –  Leo Dec 12 '12 at 21:16

given your microcontroller lib doesn't have strstr or strnstr....

char* string_first_of(char* s, char* sub)
{
    int n;
    if(s == NULL) return NULL;
    if(sub == NULL) return s;
    n =  strlen(sub);
    while(*s != 0)
    {
        if(strncmp(s, sub, n) == 0)
        {
            return s;
        }
        s++;
    }
    return NULL;    
}

bool string_contains(char* s, char* sub)
{
    return string_first_of(s, sub) != NULL;
}
share|improve this answer

As Michael suggests, you should perhaps look at strnstr.

Snippet from the documentation:

 #include <string.h>

 char *
 strnstr(const char *s1, const char *s2, size_t n);

The strnstr() function locates the first occurrence of the null-terminated string s2 in the string s1, where not more than n characters are searched.

so it seems like what you want is

char* found = strnstr(output,substring,100);

In case your C-lib is limited, the code is fairly straight forward:

char* strnstr(char* s, char* find, size_t slen)
{
    char c, sc;
    size_t len;

    if ((c = *find++) != '\0') {
        len = strlen(find);
        do {
            do {
                if ((sc = *s++) == '\0' || slen-- < 1)
                    return (NULL);
            } while (sc != c);
            if (len > slen)
                return (NULL);
        } while (strncmp(s, find, len) != 0);
        s--;
    }
    return ((char *)s);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
BTW: memmem(a, alen, b, blen) is even more general, since none of the two strings need to be nul-terminated (and both strings may conatain nuls) –  wildplasser Dec 12 '12 at 21:00

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