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I'd like to determine if a string can be created using only characters in a list. For example,

>>>acceptableChars = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'i']
>>>print isAcceptable("abc")
True
>>>print isAcceptable("xyz")
False
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1  
What have you tried? –  Brendan Long Dec 12 '12 at 21:47
    
What is there to try? Google gave nothing. –  tkbx Dec 12 '12 at 21:48
2  
"What is there to try?" Code you wrote! –  kindall Dec 12 '12 at 21:50
3  
It's extremely rare that Google actually gives "nothing" as a result. What did you search for? –  Greg Hewgill Dec 12 '12 at 21:51
1  
@abarnert: a link to that post might help the OP instead of just saying such a link exists –  inspectorG4dget Dec 12 '12 at 21:57

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Make a set from acceptableChars:

>>> acceptableChars = set('abcdefghi')

Now we can make isAcceptable check if any of the characters in its argument are not in acceptableChars using set subtraction:

>>> def isAcceptable(s):
    return set(s) <= acceptableChars
>>> isAcceptable("abc")
True
>>> isAcceptable("xyz")
False
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Why take the len of the set and compare it to 0, instead of just using the boolean value of the set itself? –  abarnert Dec 12 '12 at 21:51
1  
Better yet, I'll use the <= to check if acceptableChars is a superset of set(s). –  Sam Mussmann Dec 12 '12 at 21:53
    
Yep, that's the solution I was hoping the OP would come up with if he knew a bit about set theory. :) –  abarnert Dec 12 '12 at 21:55

Since your actual use case is:

I'm using this to check if something is a hash (0-9, a-f), so any number of duplicates would be acceptable

How about this:

intvalue = int(possiblehash, 16)

If this succeeds, that means it was a valid hex string—and you have the value, in case you need it. If it raises an exception, it wasn't a valid hex string. So:

try:
   intvalue = int(possiblehash, 16)
except Exception as e:
   print("That's not a hex string! Python says " + str(e))

If you want to use a different means to convert the hex string into some appropriate form instead of an integer, the exact same idea will apply:

try:
    binvalue = binascii.unhexlify(possiblehash)
except Exception as e:
   print("That's not a hex string! Python says " + str(e))
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def isAcceptable(text, acceptableChars=set("abcdefghi")):
    return all(char in acceptableChars for char in text)
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1  
This is guaranteed to work only if text contains no duplicate characters –  inspectorG4dget Dec 12 '12 at 21:50
1  
@inspectorG4dget: No, it's iterating over each character in text; if you have duplicate characters, it will check each duplicate, and get the same result as for the previous duplicate. So it's guaranteed to work every time. –  abarnert Dec 12 '12 at 21:53
    
Yours will give a false positive when text='aaa' and chars='abc' –  inspectorG4dget Dec 12 '12 at 21:56
1  
How is aaa a false positive? Each a is in abc. –  kindall Dec 12 '12 at 21:57
2  
OK, now I can see how @inspectorG4dget interpreted the question: can text be made up only out of a permutation of acceptableChars. I don't think it's what the OP intended, but the question is a little vague, and it's definitely not a totally unreasonable interpretation. –  abarnert Dec 12 '12 at 21:58

One possibility is to just loop over the string:

def isAcceptable(s):
    for c in s:
        if not isAcceptableChar(c):
            return False
    return True

It should be pretty obvious how to write the isAcceptableChar function.

Of course if you know a bit more about Python, you'd probably just write:

def isAcceptable(s):
    return all(isAcceptableChar(c) for c in s)

And if you know a bit about set theory, you can probably come up with a more efficient and simpler implementation.

But first get the basic one working, and then think about how to improve it.

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In [52]: all(c in acceptableChars and acceptableChars.count(c)==want.count(c) for c in want)
Out[52]: True

In [53]: acceptableChars = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e', 'f', 'g', 'h', 'i']

In [54]: want = 'abc'

In [55]: all(c in acceptableChars and acceptableChars.count(c)==want.count(c) for c in want)
Out[55]: True

In [56]: want = 'xyz'

In [57]: all(c in acceptableChars and acceptableChars.count(c)==want.count(c) for c in want)
Out[57]: False

Though, the following is a much better way to do this:

def isAcceptable(text, chars):
    store = collections.Counter(chars)
    for char in text:
        if char not in store or not store[char]:
            return False
        store[char] -= 1
    return True
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Easiest way i can think of: check whether yourString.strip('all your acceptable chars') returns you a blank string.

def isAcceptable(text, acceptable='abcdefghi'):
    return text.strip(acceptable) == ''

If the strip returns '', then the only chars in text were in acceptable as well.

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