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I'm trying to implement exception handling in a workout tracker program i created that currently has no error checking. I have a Exlist class that handles a linked list a series of functions, some important functions i would like at add exception handling:

  • Update list into text file
  • Sort list by dates
  • Edit workout(searches list using key)
  • Delete workout(searches list using key to delete)
  • Add workout

How would i go about throwing exceptions from a function inside a class and catching them in int main(). i know of simple exception handing in the same block, but i can't seem to conjure up a solution to solving this. My ideal situation would be

//in int main, when the user selects add
try
{
    WorkoutList.addEx();
} 
//other code...
//catch at end of loop and display error
catch(string error)
{
    cout << "Error in: addEx..." << error << endl;
}
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Is there anything not working with the code you presented? –  Mark Ransom Dec 12 '12 at 22:03
3  
Do not throw std::string objects! You should throw only objects of classes derived from std::exception. Although you can throw any copyable class, catching random classes makes it much harder to determine what happened. Catching std::exception const& and having a look at the what() member gives at least some hint on what went on. –  Dietmar Kühl Dec 12 '12 at 22:04
    
This is what precisely exceptions are for! Just throw them wherever, and they 'bubble up' until they're caught, destructing objects that go out of scope as they go. –  Roddy Dec 12 '12 at 22:07
    
The functions you listed that seem like they should throw are the ones involving text files and "Add workout". –  Pubby Dec 12 '12 at 22:09
1  
@DietmarKühl: I would change the wording slightly to derived from std::runtime_error (or one of its derived classes) rather than std::exception. The reason is that std::runtime_error can be constructed with an error message while std::exception can't (unless it was updated in C++11). –  Loki Astari Dec 12 '12 at 22:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should create an exception class which inherits from Exception. For example, if you want to throw it when a wrong value is added, you could do:

#include <stdexcept>
class WrongValueException : public std::runtime_error
{
    public:
        WrongValueException(string mess): std::runtime_error(mess) {}
};

Then, in the addEx() function, throw it

//SomeCode
if(value.isWrong()){
    throw WrongValueException("Wrong Value");
} else {
    //add
}

And catch it in the main:

int main(){
    //SomeCode
    try
    {
         WorkoutList.addEx();
    } 
    //other code...
    //catch at end of loop and display error
    catch(WrongValueException const& ex)
    {
        std::cerr << "WrongValueException: " << ex.what() << std::endl;
    }
    catch(std::exception const& ex)
    {
        std::cerr << "std::exception: " << ex.what() << std::endl;
        throw;
    }
    catch(...)
    {
        std::cerr << "Unknown Exception: " << ex.what() << std::endl;
        throw;
    }

The thrown exception will bubble from wherever you throw it until it gets caught. If it is not caught, the program will finish (potentially without unwinding the stack (thus it is usally best to always catch exceptions in main (to force stack unwinding) even if you re-throw).

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Fixed bugs. :-) –  Loki Astari Dec 12 '12 at 23:03

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