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For whatever reason, I wanted to see how many objects I could create and populate a LinkedList with. I used Runtime.getRuntime().freeMemory() to get the approximation of free memory in my JVM. I wrote this:

public static void main(String[] arg) {
    Scanner kb = new Scanner(System.in);
    List<Long> mem = new LinkedList<Long>();
    while (true) {
        System.out.println("Max memory: " + Runtime.getRuntime().maxMemory() + ". Available memory: " + Runtime.getRuntime().freeMemory() + " bytes. Press enter to use more.");
        String s = kb.nextLine();
        if (s.equals("m"))
        for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++) {
            mem.add(new Long(Long.MAX_VALUE));
        }
    }
}

If I write in m, the app adds a million Long objects to the list. You would think the more objects (to which we have references, so can't be gc'ed), the less free memory. Running the code:

Max memory: 1897725952. Available memory: 127257696 bytes.
m
Max memory: 1897725952. Available memory: 108426520 bytes.
m
Max memory: 1897725952. Available memory: 139873296 bytes.
m
Max memory: 1897725952. Available memory: 210632232 bytes.
m
Max memory: 1897725952. Available memory: 137268792 bytes.
m
Max memory: 1897725952. Available memory: 239504784 bytes.
m
Max memory: 1897725952. Available memory: 169507792 bytes.
m
Max memory: 1897725952. Available memory: 259686128 bytes.
m
Max memory: 1897725952. Available memory: 189293488 bytes.
m
Max memory: 1897725952. Available memory: 387686544 bytes.

The available memory fluctuates. How does this happen? Is the GC cleaning up other things (what other things are there on the heap to really clean up?), is the freeMemory() method returning an approximation that's way off? Am I missing something or am I crazy?

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5  
Well, you're creating a new Random object at each iteration. All those objects have to be GC'ed. –  JB Nizet Dec 12 '12 at 22:37
    
You dont keep a reference to the Random objects –  Hunter McMillen Dec 12 '12 at 22:38
    
@durron597 looks fine to me –  Hunter McMillen Dec 12 '12 at 22:41
    
If Xms != Xmx, the committed memory might be increasing. Plug JVisualVM (with the VisualGC plugin) on your JVM to get more insight. Or give us your JVM parameters. –  Frank Pavageau Dec 12 '12 at 22:44
    
I tried with Random and I also tried with just Long.MAX_VALUE, I get similar results. Updated it as Long.MAX_VALUE in question. –  Sotirios Delimanolis Dec 12 '12 at 23:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As you consume more memory, the heap grows. Note that freeMemory() reports usage relative to the current heap size, which can grow. Check totalMemory() instead of maxMemory(). If I'm recalling this right.

Or are you asking what is being allocated that can possibly be garbage collected?

  • The Random you allocate in the loop
  • Objects allocated during the process of reading from an OS stream, parsing into characters, then parsing into lines
  • Possibly some stuff allocated during the call to check free memory itself
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I had no idea the heap is variable size. So memory in JVM is like: [ ALL MEMORY [<<<HEAP>>>][<<STACK>>]]? And either can grow depending on needs and within max memory? –  Sotirios Delimanolis Dec 12 '12 at 23:21
    
No, its that Java gets more memory from the OS when the heap is getting full to expand the JVMs memory. Up to the Xmx limit. You can force it to grab all that upfront with Xms. –  Sean Owen Dec 13 '12 at 0:02

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