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I'm getting an unexpected version of a dependency (1.5.8) when I use the assembly plugin, but nowhere else. In my pom I have:

    <dependency>
        <groupId>org.slf4j</groupId>
        <artifactId>slf4j-log4j12</artifactId>
        <version>1.6.0</version>
    </dependency>

When I run dependency:tree or dependency:list, I see the correct version and only the correct version. When I check in Eclipse I see only the correct version.

In my assembly.xml I have:

<dependencySets>
    <dependencySet>
        <outputDirectory>lib</outputDirectory>
    </dependencySet>
</dependencySets>

In the resulting zip, I get slf4j-log4j12-1.5.8.jar. No idea where this is coming from. Any help?

Using maven 3.0.4.

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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This was due to a 'bad' assembly plugin version (2.2-beta-5). My pom.xml did not specify the plugin version. When I explicitly marked it as 2.4 (or the latest version when you read this!), the plugin pulled the correct dependency.

Lesson learned - If you get the following warning in your build:

[WARNING] 'build.plugins.plugin.version' for org.apache.maven.plugins:maven-whatever-plugin is missing
It is highly recommended to fix these problems because they threaten the stability of your build.

.. fix it!

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Thanks, switching from 2.2-beta-5 to 2.4 fixed this for me :-) –  marc.guenther Dec 20 '12 at 13:04
    
After hours of head-banging for the exact issue this question is about, this is exactly the answer I needed. Thank you! –  Stewart Apr 24 '13 at 11:37
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  1. You may try to delete the bad JAR (slf4j-log4j12-1.5.8.jar) from your maven repository and add the correct one there (slf4j-log4j12-1.6.0.jar). Then run your build with the --offline switch. In the moment that maven tries to get the wrong JAR, the build will fail and maven will show you from what transitive dependency it is trying to get it. Then you exclude it from the transistive dependencies with this:

    <exclusions>
      <exclusion>
        <artifactId>slf4j-api</artifactId>
        <groupId>slf4j-log4j12</groupId>
      </exclusion>
    </exclusions>
    
  2. Check if it the JAR that you got has the correct groupId. Some people creates duplicates of common JARs for stupid and evil special purposes that may confuse maven. In special, check if you are not getting org.jboss.resteasy:slf4j-log4j12 instead. You may ban undesired dependencies using the maven-enforcer-plugin, like this:

    <plugin>
      <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
      <artifactId>maven-enforcer-plugin</artifactId>
      <version>1.0</version>
      <executions>
        <execution>
          <id>enforce-banned-dependencies</id>
          <goals>
             <goal>enforce</goal>
          </goals>
          <configuration>
            <rules>
              <bannedDependencies>
                <excludes>
                  <exclude>org.slf4j:slf4j-log4j12:1.5.8</exclude> <!-- Wrong version, dude! -->
                  <exclude>commons-logging:*</exclude> <!-- Worst, stupidest, lamest logging framework ever! -->
                  <exclude>org.jboss.resteasy:slf4j-simple</exclude> <!-- Evil JAR duplication. -->
                  <exclude>org.jboss.resteasy:slf4j-api</exclude> <!-- Evil JAR duplication. -->
                  <exclude>org.jboss.resteasy:slf4j-log4j12</exclude> <!-- Evil JAR duplication. -->
                  <exclude>org.jboss.resteasy:jackson-core-asl</exclude> <!-- Evil JAR duplication. -->
                  <exclude>org.jboss.resteasy:jackson-mapper-asl</exclude> <!-- Evil JAR duplication. -->
                  <exclude>org.jboss.resteasy:jackson-core-lgpl</exclude> <!-- Evil JAR duplication. -->
                  <exclude>org.jboss.resteasy:jackson-mapper-lgpl</exclude> <!-- Evil JAR duplication. -->
                  <exclude>org.codehaus.jackson:jackson-core-lgpl</exclude> <!-- Two distinct packages for the exact same thing always creates conflicts. We want the ASL one. -->
                  <exclude>org.codehaus.jackson:jackson-mapper-lgpl</exclude> <!-- Two distinct packages for the exact same thing always creates conflicts. We want the ASL one. -->
                  <exclude>velocity-tools:velocity-tools</exclude> <!-- Was renamed. -->
                  <exclude>velocity:velocity</exclude> <!-- Was renamed. -->
                  <exclude>struts:struts</exclude> <!-- Was renamed. -->
                  <exclude>javassist:javassist</exclude> <!-- Was renamed. -->
                  <exclude>axis:*</exclude> <!-- Was renamed to org.apache.axis:* and wsdl4j:wsdl4j . -->
                  <exclude>commons-beanutils:commons-beanutils-core</exclude> <!-- Redundant package. -->
                  <exclude>xpp3:xpp3_min</exclude> <!-- Redundant package. -->
                  <exclude>xml-apis:xml-apis:2.0.0</exclude> <!-- Bad package, for some strange reason 2.0.x is inferior to 1.4.x. -->
                  <exclude>xml-apis:xml-apis:2.0.2</exclude> <!-- Bad package, for some strange reason 2.0.x is inferior to 1.4.x. -->
                  <exclude>quartz:quartz</exclude> <!-- Was renamed. -->
                </excludes>
              </bannedDependencies>
            </rules>
          </configuration>
        </execution>
      </executions>
    </plugin>
    
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Or simple run mvn dependency:tree to find the transitive dependency and exclude the jar as mentioned above. –  om39a Dec 13 '12 at 4:49
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