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Currently teaching myself Python, and learning file I/O by writing a script to both read from and add text to an existing file. The script runs up until I call the write() method, at which point it throws out a non-specific exception - this is the traceback:

            File "test.py", line 13, in <module>
                f.write(txt)
            IOError: [Errno 0] Error

My code:

            from sys import argv

            script, filename = argv

            f = open(filename, 'a+')

            print("The contents of %s are:") % filename

            print f.read()

            txt = raw_input("What would you like to add? ")

            f.write(txt)

            print("The new contents are:")

            print f.read()

            f.close()

My environment is Python 2.7.3 in Win7, PowerShell, and Notepad++.

What is causing this? How would I fix it? In my understanding, the a+ access mode should allow me to both read and append to the file. Changing the access mode to r+ yields the same exception.

Clarifications:

  • I have an existing text file (a.txt) with a single word in it that I pass as an argument to the script, like so:

            python test.py a.txt
    
  • I am under an admin account in Windows.

Results:

At the minimum, adding two seek() commands fixes the issue - detailed in the answer post.

share|improve this question
1  
does your user have the right permissions to write? –  Colleen Dec 13 '12 at 0:10
    
Also, an example of txt would be helpful. –  Colleen Dec 13 '12 at 0:10
    
Do you use multithreaded ? –  lucemia Dec 13 '12 at 0:18
    
I've tested inputting 'txt' (in PowerShell) both as an alphanumeric string, or purely characters. How would I check my write permissions? I'm under an admin account in Win (if it helps.) @lucemia - What do you mean by 'use multithreaded'? –  interloper Dec 13 '12 at 0:20
    
Try .writelines(txt) instead of .write(txt) Just a quick idea :) –  jon_shep Dec 13 '12 at 0:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A problem when one tries to add a text of little size: it remains in the buffer, that keeps the text before the real writing is done after receiving more data.
So, to be sure to write really, do as it is described in the doc concerning os.fsync() and flush()

By the way, it is better to use the with statement.

And it's still more better to use binary mode. In your case, there shouldn't be a problem because you just add text after the reading and just use seek(o,o) . But when one wants to move correctly the file's pointer into the bytes of the file, it is absolutely necessary to use binary mode [ the 'b' in open(filename, 'rb+') ]

I personnaly never use 'a+', I've never understood what are its effects.

from sys import argv
from os import fsync

script, filename = argv

with open(filename, 'rb+') as f:
    print("The contents of %s are:") % filename
    print f.read()

    f.seek(0,2)
    txt = raw_input("What would you like to add? ")
    f.write(txt)
    f.flush()
    fsync(f.fileno())

    f.seek(0,0)
    print("The new contents are:")
    print f.read()
share|improve this answer
    
This code exhibits the same error as the one in the question unfortunately. –  jgritty Dec 13 '12 at 1:07
    
I can confirm; the provided code still yields the same issue. –  interloper Dec 13 '12 at 1:10
    
@jgritty You are right, it wasn't working on my own computer. I've added seek(0,2] and now it works. I think that after the reading, the file's pointer is just after the EOF, and seek(0,2) moves it to the right place just before the EOF (end of file). Though someone said to me here on stackoverflow that an EOF doesn't really exist (!!). Anyway, adding seek(0,2) makes the code to work –  eyquem Dec 13 '12 at 1:26
    
That does seem to fix it. Who would ever guess seek(0, 2) would be necessary. –  jgritty Dec 13 '12 at 1:32
    
@jgritty Certainly someone who has struggled a lot against the IO processings :) –  eyquem Dec 13 '12 at 1:34

For some reason print f.read() doesn't work for me on OS X when you have opened the file in a+ mode.

On Max OS X, changing the open mode to r+ and then adding a f.seek(0) line before the second read makes it work. Sadly, this doesn't help windows.

This is the working code on Mac OS:

from sys import argv

script, filename = argv

f = open(filename, 'r+')

print("The contents of %s are:") % filename

print f.read()

txt = raw_input("What would you like to add? ")

f.write(txt)

print("The new contents are:")

f.seek(0)
print f.read()

f.close()

This is the only way I could get it to work on windows 7:

from sys import argv

script, filename = argv

f = open(filename, 'r')

print("The contents of %s are:") % filename

print f.read()
f.close()

txt = raw_input("What would you like to add? ")

f = open(filename, 'a')
f.write(txt)
f.close()
f = open(filename, 'r')

print("The new contents are:")

print f.read()

f.close()

Which seems super hacky. This should also work on Mac OS X too.

share|improve this answer
    
To clarify, I have an existing text file with a single word in it that I pass as an argument to the script. How would I go about verifying write access? Is it the same as the regular user permissions settings in Win7? (If so, I'm under and Admin account and have the proper permissions as far as I can see.) –  interloper Dec 13 '12 at 0:32
    
I don't think that's the problem now –  jgritty Dec 13 '12 at 0:34
    
Thanks for the Win7 code, but doesn't that basically defy the point of having the compound read+write modes? I wonder what's responsible. –  interloper Dec 13 '12 at 0:50
    
It totally does defy it, and I have no idea why the first code doesn't work on windows. It just doesn't. It seems like a bug somewhere. –  jgritty Dec 13 '12 at 0:51
    
@jgritty Using close() has the same effect than flush() and fsync() in my code: before the closing is performed, the writing of what remains in the buffer is forced. –  eyquem Dec 13 '12 at 1:03

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