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I have a design question. I'm working with a Coded UI test framework that someone wrote and I am maintaining. I am convinced the way this is designed incorrectly but I thought I would get some other opinions. It's basically a large static class whose sole purpose is to create and return other objects.

Good/Bad...why? I am lobbying to take on a pretty significant refactor and want to please my case convincingly to my manager.

public static class ParentClass
{
    private static ChildClass1 childClass1;
    private static ChildClass2 childClass2;
    // 10+ more of the same

    // Properties
    public ChildClass1 ChildClass1
    {
        get 
        {
            if (childClass1 == null)
            {
                childClass1 = new ChildClass1();
            }
            return childClass1;
        }
     }

    public ChildClass2 ChildClass2
    {
        get 
        {
            if (childClass2 == null)
            {
                childClass2 = new ChildClass2();
            }
            return childClass2;
        }
    }
    // 10+ more of the same
}



[TestClass]
public class TestClass1
{
    [TestMethod]
    public void TestMethod1()
    {
        var x = ParentClass.ChildClass1.SomeMethod();
        Assert.IsNotNull(x);
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void TestMethod2()
    {
        var x = ParentClass.ChildClass2.SomeMethod();
        Assert.IsNotNull(x);
    }

    // 10+ more of the same
}
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1  
Side note: "They" are always writing bad code, otherwise it would be "we"/"our"... consider editing your post to remove "horribly" and generally make it more calm... –  Alexei Levenkov Dec 13 '12 at 2:14
    
Thanks, edited. –  Chags Dec 13 '12 at 2:19
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is something like a singleton pattern but it does not become clear from the provided code why it is designed this way.

var x = ParentClass.ChildClass1.SomeMethod();

could easily be replaced with

var x = new ChildClass1().SomeMethod();

and then you can get rid of ParentClass.ChildClass1 and ParentClass.childClass1 unless ParentClass.ChildClass1 is used several times and carries state from method call to method call.

But while this does not really look elegant and might be overly verbose, I would not consider this a major issue.

Personally I would have implemented it this way but it is hard to tell if this would work for all the omitted code.

[TestClass]
public class TestClass1
{
    private static void ExecuteTestCore<T>() where T : new(), IHaveAMethod
    {
        var x = new T().SomeMethod();

        Assert.IsNotNull(x);
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void TestMethod1()
    {
        TestClass1.ExecuteTestCore<ChildClass1>();
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void TestMethod2()
    {
        TestClass1.ExecuteTestCore<ChildClass2>();
    }

    // 10+ more of the same.
}

internal interface IHaveAMethod
{
    void SomeMethod();
}
share|improve this answer
    
You wouldn't consider the blatant DRY principle violations a major issue? (serious question.. I certainly would after 2-3 of the same properties doing the same thing) –  Simon Whitehead Dec 13 '12 at 2:17
    
Also, the reason the ParentClass is there is to provide a "sort-of" Singleton factory. –  Simon Whitehead Dec 13 '12 at 2:23
    
There are several properties with the same internal structure but they all hold instances of different types. Yes, one could think about refactoring the property getter using a generic method or something similar, but this is nothing I would consider a major issue. –  Daniel Brückner Dec 13 '12 at 2:23
    
The provided code does not answer the question if the singletons are really needed. It suggests every instance is used exactly one. –  Daniel Brückner Dec 13 '12 at 2:26
    
Also, I should mention that each time a new UI Map is created (ChildClassX), it is added to this parent class and then used via the static parent class in the tests. –  Chags Dec 13 '12 at 2:31
show 1 more comment

It's hard to tell if this is "good" or "bad" without knowing how it's used, but I would suggest looking at IoC containers. They offer this type of capability and much more out of the box

In general, IoC containers can be very useful if used as part of Dependency Injection. If you're not using DI then this static class is probably not very helpful

What's the simplest IOC container for C#?

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not looking for a way to accomplish this, I'm more looking to get an opinion on this design. Whether it is good (acceptable) or bad design. –  Chags Dec 13 '12 at 2:13
    
OK -- hard to tell if the design is useful or not without knowing more about how it is used. In general, IoC containers can be very useful if used as part of Dependency Injection. If you're not using DI then this static class is probably not very helpful –  pickles Dec 13 '12 at 2:15
    
Context: ChildClassX are UI Maps (object repository). They give access to GUI controls via CodedUI. It seems to me the author of the code's intention was to create a simpler way to access objects. –  Chags Dec 13 '12 at 2:27
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If you have a hard time suggesting IoC to the suits (as others have suggested).. show them smaller code perhaps?

public class ParentClass<T> where T : class, new() {
    private static T _instance = null;
    private static readonly object _locker = new object();

    public static T GetObject() {
        if (_instance == null) {
            lock (_locker) {
                if (_instance == null) {
                    return new T();
                }
                return _instance;
            }
        }
    }
}

(Disclaimer: Not tested. Possibly not the best thread-safe implementation either)

Also: The design as it stands is hard to maintain.. and wreaks of DRY violations.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I'm not familiar with IoC but it seems other a couple people have suggested it so I will look into that. –  Chags Dec 13 '12 at 2:22
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For what I can see this class is a "singleton container" I think this can be OK. If exists a better way to do it? I think it depends of the context of usage.

Useful links: SingletonPattern ObjectFactory

share|improve this answer
    
Context: ChildClassX are UI Maps (object repository). They give access to GUI controls via CodedUI. –  Chags Dec 13 '12 at 2:21
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