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Here is a reduced version of my Makefile:

.PHONY: all 

all: src/server.coffee
  mkdir -p bin
  ./node_modules/.bin/coffee -c -o bin src/server.coffee

I want to run make and only have it recompile when src/server.coffee has changed. However, it recompiles every time I run make:

$ make
mkdir -p bin
./node_modules/.bin/coffee -c -o bin src/server.coffee
$ make
mkdir -p bin
./node_modules/.bin/coffee -c -o bin src/server.coffee

If I change my Makefile to not use a phony target, it works as expected. New Makefile:

bin/server.js: src/server.coffee
  mkdir -p bin
  ./node_modules/.bin/coffee -c -o bin src/server.coffee

Result:

$ make
mkdir -p bin
./node_modules/.bin/coffee -c -o bin src/server.coffee
$ make
make: `bin/server.js' is up to date.

Why won't it respect my dependencies with a phony target? The reason I ask is because in reality, I won't just be compiling a single file into a single other file, so I don't want to have to keep track of the names of all the output files to use as targets.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Rather than a phony target (which as @cmotley points out, is working exactly as it should) what you might use when you want to avoid extra work is an "empty target":

The empty target is a variant of the phony target; it is used to hold recipes for an action that you request explicitly from time to time. Unlike a phony target, this target file can really exist; but the file's contents do not matter, and usually are empty.

The purpose of the empty target file is to record, with its last-modification time, when the rule's recipe was last executed. It does so because one of the commands in the recipe is a touch command to update the target file.

However, in this case there's really no need to add an extra empty output file — you already have the output of your CoffeeScript compilation! That fits the more typical Makefile pattern, as you already demonstrated in your question. What you could do is refactor to this approach:

.PHONY: all
all: bin/server.js

bin/server.js: src/server.coffee
  mkdir -p bin
  ./node_modules/.bin/coffee -c -o bin src/server.coffee

Now you have two things: a nice conventional "all" target that is correctly phony but won't do extra work. You are also in a better position to make this more generic so you can easily add more files:

.PHONY: all
all: bin/server.js bin/other1.js bin/other2.js

bin/%.js: src/%.coffee
  mkdir -p bin
  ./node_modules/.bin/coffee -c -o bin $<
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According to the Make documentation:

The prerequisites of the special target .PHONY are considered
to be phony targets. When it is time to consider such a target, 
make will run its recipe unconditionally, regardless of whether 
a file with that name exists or what its last-modification time is.

http://www.gnu.org/software/make/manual/html_node/Special-Targets.html

Make runs the recipe of PHONY targets unconditionally - prerequisites don't matter.

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Okay, that's pretty straightforward. Do you know of any good workaround to achieve the goal of not having to explicitly declare the output files that depend on a set of source files? –  Jonah Kagan Dec 13 '12 at 3:51
    
You could declare some variables to track source files and object files. For example, SRC = $(wildcard ./src/*.c) and OBJECTS = $(patsubst %.c, %.o, $(SRC)). Then, $(OBJECTS) could be a prerequisite for your target. I think that's what you're trying to do. –  cmotley Dec 13 '12 at 3:58

There needs to be some target file to compare against the modification time of server.coffee file. Since you don't have a concrete target make cannot know if the output is newer then the dependency or not, so it will always build all.

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Ah, thanks. I didn't realize that's how make computed which files needed to be recompiled. Very helpful –  Jonah Kagan Dec 13 '12 at 4:16

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